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2 posts from December 2017

December 20, 2017

The Fed’s Balance Sheet, Night Lights, and the Other Top LSE Posts of 2017



LSE_The Fed’s Balance Sheet, Night Lights, and the Other Top LSE Posts of 2017

In the spirit of this season of year-end lists of accomplishments, Liberty Street Economics offers a roundup of our most viewed posts. Our readers continued to gravitate toward timely, topical posts; our most popular explained how the Fed manages its enlarged balance sheet—a major focus of the FOMC, Congress, markets, and economists. Prompted by reader questions in response to their first post, the authors also penned a follow-up post. Another hit this year described an innovative indicator of economic growth—night light intensity measured via satellite—and used it to fact-check official Chinese growth estimates.

Continue reading "The Fed’s Balance Sheet, Night Lights, and the Other Top LSE Posts of 2017" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Federal Reserve, Household Finance | Permalink | Comments (0)

December 15, 2017

Political Polarization in Consumer Expectations



LSE_Political Polarization in Consumer Expectations

Following the 2016 presidential election, as noted on this blog and many other outlets, Americans’ political and economic outlook changed dramatically depending on partisan affiliation. Immediately after the election, Republicans became substantially more optimistic relative to Democrats. In this blog post, we revisit the issue of polarization over the past twelve months using data from the New York Fed’s Survey of Consumer Expectations (SCE)—also the focus of a detailed technical overview in the latest edition of the Bank’s journal, the Economic Policy Review. The overview walks readers through the design and implementation of the survey, as well as the computation of the various statistics released by the SCE team every month.

Continue reading "Political Polarization in Consumer Expectations" »

Posted by Blog Author at 11:00 AM in Expectations | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Liberty Street Economics features insight and analysis from New York Fed economists working at the intersection of research and policy. Launched in 2011, the blog takes its name from the Bank’s headquarters at 33 Liberty Street in Manhattan’s Financial District.

The editors are Michael Fleming, Andrew Haughwout, Thomas Klitgaard, and Donald Morgan, all economists in the Bank’s Research Group.

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