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7 posts on "Hey, Economist!"

June 16, 2017

Hey, Economist! How Do You Forecast the Present?



LSE_Hey, Economist! How Do You Forecast the Present?

New York Fed macroeconomists have been sharing their “nowcast” of GDP growth on the Bank’s public website since April 2016. Now, they’ve launched an interactive version of the Nowcasting Report, which updates the point forecast each week, but also helps users better visualize the impact of the flow of incoming data on the estimate produced by the model. Tables offer more detail on the data series informing the estimate. The interactive version also reports the staff nowcast back to January 2016, a longer nowcast history than has previously been available. Cross-media editor Anna Snider spoke to Domenico Giannone, Argia Sbordone, and Andrea Tambalotti—economists who developed the model underlying the report and produce estimates weekly with the help of research analysts Brandyn Bok and Daniele Caratelli—about nowcasting and its role in the policymaking process.

Continue reading "Hey, Economist! How Do You Forecast the Present?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 11:15 AM in Forecasting, Hey, Economist!, Macroecon | Permalink | Comments (0)

May 19, 2017

Hey, Economist! Is Now a Good Time to Be Graduating from College?



LSE_2017_Hey, Economist! Is Now a Good Time to Be Graduating from College?

With the 2017 college graduation season in full swing, we thought it would be helpful to take stock of the job prospects for recent college graduates. Is now a good time to be graduating from college? Publications editor Trevor Delaney caught up with Jaison Abel and Richard Deitz, two economists in our Research and Statistics Group, to discuss some of their work on the labor market for recent college graduates.

Continue reading "Hey, Economist! Is Now a Good Time to Be Graduating from College?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Education, Hey, Economist!, Labor Economics, Unemployment | Permalink | Comments (2)

December 21, 2016

Hey, Economist! Tobias Adrian Reflects on His Work at the N.Y. Fed before Heading to the IMF

LSE_Hey, Economist! Tobias Adrian Reflects on His Work at the N.Y. Fed before Heading to the IMF

Tobias Adrian is leaving the New York Fed to become the Financial Counselor and Director of the Monetary and Capital Markets Department at the International Monetary Fund (IMF). In announcing Adrian’s appointment, Christine Lagarde, managing director of the IMF, described Tobias as “internationally highly regarded for his insightful analytical work.” Until he starts his new position at the beginning of 2017, Adrian will be winding down his service as Senior Vice President of the New York Fed and Associate Director of the Bank’s Research and Statistics Group. Before he moves on to the IMF, Adrian shared some insight on his time at the Bank.

Continue reading "Hey, Economist! Tobias Adrian Reflects on His Work at the N.Y. Fed before Heading to the IMF" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Hey, Economist!, Monetary Policy | Permalink | Comments (2)

July 08, 2016

Hey, Economist! Why—and When—Did the Treasury Embrace Regular and Predictable Issuance?



LSE_Why—and When—Did the Treasury Embrace Regular and Predictable Issuance?

Few people know the Treasury market from as many angles as Ken Garbade, a senior vice president in the Money and Payments Studies area of the New York Fed’s Research Group. Ken taught financial markets at NYU’s graduate school of business for many years before heading to Wall Street to assume a position in the research department of the primary dealer division of Bankers Trust Company. At Bankers, Ken conducted relative-value research on the Treasury market, assessing how return varies relative to risk for particular Treasury securities. For a time, he also traded single-payment Treasury obligations known as STRIPS—although not especially successfully, he notes.

Continue reading "Hey, Economist! Why—and When—Did the Treasury Embrace Regular and Predictable Issuance?" »

June 27, 2016

Hey, Economist! How Is the Research and Statistics Group Changing?



LSE_Hey, Economist! How Is the Research and Statistics Group Changing?

As Director of Research for the New York Fed for the past seven years, Jamie McAndrews has been responsible for the Bank’s financial and economic policy research, as well as the collection of data and statistics from financial institutions. On the eve of his retirement on June 30, Jamie shared his perspective on how the Research and Statistics Group has changed with Andrew Haughwout, a senior vice president in the Group.

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Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in DSGE, Hey, Economist!, Macroecon, Monetary Policy | Permalink | Comments (1)

April 01, 2016

Hey, Economist! What Did You Make of “The Big Short”?



LSE_2016_big-short_bram_460_art

The Big Short has been making a big splash this year, racking up five Academy Award nominations and taking home the Oscar for best adapted screenplay. The movie provides a very entertaining way to gain an understanding about some of the underpinnings of the financial crisis, particularly through a few memorable cutaway scenes—such as when actress Margot Robbie explains mortgage-backed securities (MBS) from a bubble bath, chef Anthony Bourdain compares collateralized debt obligations (CDOs) to seafood stew, and singer Selena Gomez explains synthetic CDOs using the analogy of “side bets” made by people watching a casino blackjack game.

Continue reading "Hey, Economist! What Did You Make of “The Big Short”?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Financial Markets, Hey, Economist!, Housing | Permalink | Comments (0)

March 04, 2016

Hey, Economist! How Well Do We Weather Snowstorms?



LSE_2016_qa-snowstorm_bram_460_art


Editors’ note: With this post, Liberty Street Economics launches an occasional series featuring interviews with our economists about their areas of expertise or recent research. In today’s post, Trevor Delaney, one of our publications editors, caught up with Jason Bram, a research officer in our Regional Analysis division to discuss how snowstorms do, or don’t, affect New York City’s economy. With a bit of snow expected here this weekend, the timing is auspicious.

Continue reading "Hey, Economist! How Well Do We Weather Snowstorms?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Hey, Economist!, Regional Analysis | Permalink | Comments (2)
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