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40 posts on "Wages"

August 26, 2015

Mind the Gap: Assessing Labor Market Slack



LSE_2015_mind-the-gap_kapon_460_art

Indicators of labor market slack enable economists to judge pressures on wages and prices. Direct measures of slack, however, are not available and must be constructed. Here, we build on our previous work using the employment-to-population (E/P) ratio and develop an updated measure of labor market slack based on the behavior of labor compensation. Our measure indicates that roughly 90 percent of the labor gap that opened up following the recession has been closed.

Continue reading "Mind the Gap: Assessing Labor Market Slack" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Labor Economics, Labor Market, Macroecon, Phillips Curve, Wages | Permalink | Comments (2)

August 05, 2015

When Women Out-Earn Men



LSE_2015_gender-wage-gap_deitz_450_art


We often hear that women earn “77 cents on the dollar” compared with men. However, the gender pay gap among recent college graduates is actually much smaller than this figure suggests. We estimate that among recent college graduates, women earn roughly 97 cents on the dollar compared with men who have the same college major and perform the same jobs. Moreover, what may be surprising is that at the start of their careers, women actually out-earn men by a substantial margin for a number of college majors. However, our analysis shows that as workers approach mid-career, the wage premium that young women enjoy in these majors completely disappears, and males earn a more substantial premium in nearly every major. We discuss some of the possible reasons why the gender wage gap widens as workers progress through their careers.


Continue reading "When Women Out-Earn Men" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Labor Economics, Wages | Permalink | Comments (2)

July 13, 2015

The Survey of Consumer Expectations Turns Two!



Survey of Consumer Expectations

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s Survey of Consumer Expectations (SCE) turned two years old in June. In this post, we review some of the key findings from the first two years of the survey’s history, highlighting the most noteworthy trends revealed in the data.

Continue reading "The Survey of Consumer Expectations Turns Two!" »

Posted by Blog Author at 11:00 AM in Expectations, Household Finance, Inflation, Labor Economics, Wages | Permalink | Comments (0)

May 20, 2015

Why Are Interest Rates So Low?



Second post in the series
In a recent series of blog posts, the former Chairman of the Federal Reserve System, Ben Bernanke, has asked the question: “Why are interest rates so low?” (See part 1, part 2, and part 3.) He refers, of course, to the fact that the U.S. government is able to borrow at an annualized rate of around 2 percent for ten years, or around 3 percent for thirty years. If you expect that inflation is going to be on average 2 percent over the next ten or thirty years, this implies that the U.S. government can borrow at real rates of interest between 0 and 1 percent at the ten- and thirty-year maturities. This phenomenon is by no means limited to the United States. Governments in Japan and Germany are able to borrow for ten years at nominal rates below 1 percent, and the ten-year yield on Swiss government debt is slightly negative. Why is that?

Continue reading "Why Are Interest Rates So Low?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in DSGE, Financial Markets, Macroecon, Monetary Policy, Wages | Permalink | Comments (7)

May 18, 2015

The FRBNY DSGE Model Forecast--April 2015



First in a two-part series

There are various types of economic forecasts, such as judgmental forecasts or model-based forecasts. In this post, we provide an update of the economic forecasts implied by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s (FRBNY) dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) model, which we introduced in a series of five blog posts in September 2014 here. It continues to predict a gradual recovery in economic activity with a progressive but slow return of inflation toward the Federal Open Market Committee’s (FOMC) long-run target of 2 percent. This forecast remains surrounded by significant uncertainty. Please note that the DSGE model forecasts are not the official New York Fed staff forecasts, but only an input to the overall forecasting process at the Bank.

Continue reading "The FRBNY DSGE Model Forecast--April 2015 " »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in DSGE, Forecasting, Macroecon, Monetary Policy, Wages | Permalink | Comments (0)

November 19, 2014

The Long-Term Unemployed and the Wages of New Hires



Third in a three-part series
This is the third in a series of blog posts on the topic of measuring labor market slack. In this post, we assess the relationships between short- and long-term unemployment and wages by comparing the differences in states’ experiences over the business cycle. While all states felt the impact of the Great Recession, some fared better than others. Consequently, it is possible to use differences in the composition and shifts of short- and long-term unemployment to determine whether short-term unemployment exerts a greater influence on wage determination. The results suggest that there is little difference in how long-term and short-term unemployment affect wages, and as a consequence, the long-term unemployed shouldn’t be dismissed when evaluating labor market slack.

Continue reading "The Long-Term Unemployed and the Wages of New Hires" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Inflation, Labor Economics, Macroecon, Unemployment, Wages | Permalink | Comments (3)

November 18, 2014

How Attached to the Labor Market Are the Long-Term Unemployed?



Second in a three-part series
In this second post in our series on measuring labor market slack, we analyze the labor market outcomes of long-term unemployed workers to assess their employability and labor force attachment. If long-term unemployed workers are essentially nonparticipants, their job-finding prospects and attachment to the labor force should resemble those of nonparticipants who are not looking for a job and should differ considerably from those of short-term unemployed workers. Using data that allow us to follow workers over longer time periods, we find that differences in labor market outcomes between short- and long-term unemployed workers exist, but these differences narrow at longer horizons. In contrast, labor market outcomes for the long-term unemployed are substantially different from those of nonparticipants who do not want a job.

Continue reading "How Attached to the Labor Market Are the Long-Term Unemployed?" »

November 17, 2014

Measuring Labor Market Slack: Are the Long-Term Unemployed Different?



Istock-longterm-unemployed-450_caption
First in a three-part series
There has been some debate in the Liberty Street Economics blog and in other outlets, such as Krueger, Cramer, and Cho (2014) and Gordon (2013), about whether the short-term unemployment rate is a better measure of slack than the overall unemployment rate. As the chart below shows, the two measures are sending different signals, with the short-term unemployment rate back to its pre-recession level while the overall rate is still elevated because of a high long-term unemployment rate. One can argue that the unemployment rate is exaggerating the extent of underutilization in the labor market, based on the premise that the long-term unemployed are, in practice, out of the labor force and likely to exert little pressure on earnings. If this is indeed the case, inflationary pressures might start building up sooner than suggested by the overall unemployment rate. In a three-part series, we study the available evidence on the long-term unemployed and argue against this premise. The long-term unemployed should not be excluded from measures of labor market slack.

Continue reading "Measuring Labor Market Slack: Are the Long-Term Unemployed Different?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Labor Economics, Labor Market, Macroecon, Unemployment, Wages | Permalink | Comments (3)

November 05, 2014

Forecasting Inflation with Fundamentals . . . It’s Hard!



Controlling inflation is at the core of monetary policymaking, and central bankers would like to have access to reliable inflation forecasts to assess their progress in achieving this goal. Producing accurate inflation forecasts, however, turns out not to be a trivial exercise. This posts reviews the key challenges in inflation forecasting and discusses some recent developments that attempt to deal with these challenges.

Continue reading "Forecasting Inflation with Fundamentals . . . It’s Hard!" »

September 04, 2014

College May Not Pay Off for Everyone

Jaison R. Abel and Richard Deitz

This post is the third in a series of four Liberty Street Economics posts examining the value
of a college degree
.


In our recent Current Issues article and blog post on the value of a college degree, we showed that the economic benefits of a bachelor’s degree still far outweigh the costs. However, this does not mean that college is a good investment for everyone. Our work, like the work of many others who come to a similar conclusion, is based in large part on the empirical observation that the average wages of college graduates are significantly higher than the average wages of those with only a high school diploma. However, not all college students come from Lake Wobegon, where “all of the children are above average.” In this post, we show that a good number of college graduates earn wages that are not materially different from those of the typical worker with just a high school diploma. This suggests that, at least from an economic perspective, college may not pay off for a significant number of people.

Continue reading "College May Not Pay Off for Everyone" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Human Capital, Labor Economics, Wages | Permalink | Comments (4)
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