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4 posts from June 2018

June 27, 2018

Why New York City Subway Delays Don’t Affect All Riders Equally



LSE_2018_Why New York City Subway Delays Don’t Affect All Riders Equally

The state of the New York City subway system has worsened considerably over the past few years. As a consequence of rising ridership and decaying infrastructure, the network is plagued by delays and frequently fails to deliver New Yorkers to their destinations on time. While these delays are a headache for anyone who depends on the subway to get around, they do not affect all riders in the same way. In this post, we explain why subway delays disproportionately affect low-income New Yorkers. We show that wealthier commuters who rely on the subway are less likely to experience extensive issues on their commutes.

Continue reading "Why New York City Subway Delays Don’t Affect All Riders Equally" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Demographics, Employment, Household Finance, Human Capital, Inequality, New York, New York City, Regional Analysis, Wages | Permalink | Comments (0)

June 25, 2018

How Is Technology Changing the Mortgage Market?



LSE_How Is Technology Changing the Mortgage Market?


The adoption of new technologies is transforming the mortgage industry. For instance, borrowers can now obtain a mortgage entirely online, and lenders use increasingly sophisticated methods to verify borrower income and assets. In a recent staff report, we present evidence suggesting that technology is reducing frictions in mortgage lending, such as reducing the time it takes to originate a mortgage, and increasing the elasticity of mortgage supply. These benefits do not seem to come at the cost of less careful screening of borrowers.

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Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Financial Intermediation, Mortgages | Permalink | Comments (0)

June 19, 2018

At the New York Fed: Conference on the Effects of Post-Crisis Banking Reforms



The financial crisis of 2007-08 and the ensuing recession, the most severe since the 1930s, prompted a wave of regulatory reforms: tighter bank capital and liquidity rules, new failed bank resolution procedures, a stand-alone consumer protection agency, greater transparency in money market funds, central clearing of derivatives, and others as well. As these reforms have gradually taken effect, a healthy debate has emerged in the policy and academic communities over their efficacy in achieving their intended goals and possible unintended consequences.

Continue reading "At the New York Fed: Conference on the Effects of Post-Crisis Banking Reforms" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Banks, Regulation | Permalink | Comments (0)

June 01, 2018

Hey, Economist! Outgoing New York Fed President Bill Dudley on FOMC Preparation and Thinking Like an Economist

LSE_2018.06.01-LSE-Dudley_920x576

Bill Dudley will soon turn over the keys to the vault—so to speak. But before his tenure ends after nine years as president of the New York Fed, Liberty Street Economics sought to capture his parting reflections on economic research, FOMC preparation, and leadership. Publications editor Trevor Delaney recently caught up with Dudley. This transcript has been lightly edited.

Continue reading "Hey, Economist! Outgoing New York Fed President Bill Dudley on FOMC Preparation and Thinking Like an Economist" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Banks, Federal Reserve, Hey, Economist!, Monetary Policy | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Liberty Street Economics features insight and analysis from New York Fed economists working at the intersection of research and policy. Launched in 2011, the blog takes its name from the Bank’s headquarters at 33 Liberty Street in Manhattan’s Financial District.

The editors are Michael Fleming, Andrew Haughwout, Thomas Klitgaard, and Asani Sarkar, all economists in the Bank’s Research Group.

The views expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the position of the New York Fed or the Federal Reserve System.


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