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7 posts from March 2021

March 31, 2021

The New York Fed DSGE Model Forecast—March 2021



This post presents an update of the economic forecasts generated by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) model. The model projects solid growth over the next two years, with core inflation slowly rising toward 2 percent. Uncertainty for both output and inflation forecasts remains large.

Continue reading "The New York Fed DSGE Model Forecast—March 2021" »

Posted by Blog Author at 9:00 AM in Forecasting, Inflation, Macroecon, Pandemic | Permalink | Comments (0)

March 29, 2021

Who Pays What First? Debt Prioritization during the COVID Pandemic



Who Pays What First? Debt Prioritization during the COVID Pandemic

Since the depths of the Great Recession, household debt has increased from a low of $11 trillion in 2013 to more than $14 trillion in 2020 (see the New York Fed Household Debt and Credit Report). In this post, we examine how consumers’ repayment priorities have evolved over that time. Specifically, we seek to answer the following question: When consumers repay some but not all of their loans, which types do they choose to keep paying and which do they fall behind on?

Continue reading "Who Pays What First? Debt Prioritization during the COVID Pandemic" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Household | Permalink | Comments (1)

March 25, 2021

Reasonable Seasonals? Seasonal Echoes in Economic Data after COVID-19



Reasonable Seasonals? Seasonal Echoes in Economic Data after COVID-190

Seasonal adjustment is a key statistical procedure underlying the creation of many economic series. Large economic shocks, such as the 2007-09 downturn, can generate lasting seasonal echoes in subsequent data. In this Liberty Street Economics post, we discuss the prospects for these echo effects after last year’s sharp economic contraction by focusing on the payroll employment series published by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). We note that seasonal echoes may lead the official numbers to overstate actual changes in payroll employment modestly between March and July of this year after which distortions flip the other way.

Continue reading "Reasonable Seasonals? Seasonal Echoes in Economic Data after COVID-19" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Economic History, Employment, Pandemic | Permalink | Comments (0)

March 24, 2021

Did Dealers Fail to Make Markets during the Pandemic?



In March 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted a range of financial markets, the ability of dealers to maintain liquid conditions in these markets was questioned. Reflecting these concerns, authorities took numerous steps, including providing regulatory relief to dealers. In this post, we examine liquidity provision by dealers in several financial markets during the pandemic: how much was provided, possible causes of any shortfalls, and the effects of the Federal Reserve’s actions.

Continue reading "Did Dealers Fail to Make Markets during the Pandemic?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Dealers, Financial Markets, Liquidity, Pandemic, Treasury | Permalink | Comments (0)

March 22, 2021

The Persistent Compression of the Breakeven Inflation Curve



Breakeven inflation, defined as the difference in the yield of a nominal Treasury security and a Treasury Inflation-Protected Security (TIPS) of the same maturity, is closely watched by market participants and policymakers alike. Breakeven inflation rates provide a signal about the expected path of inflation as perceived by market participants although they are also affected by risk and liquidity premia. In this post, we scrutinize the dynamics of breakeven inflation, highlighting some intriguing behavior which has persisted for a number of years and even through the pandemic. In particular, we document a substantial downward shift in the level of breakeven inflation as well as a marked flattening of the breakeven inflation curve.

Continue reading "The Persistent Compression of the Breakeven Inflation Curve" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Expectations, Financial Markets, Inflation | Permalink | Comments (0)

March 19, 2021

Looking Back at 10 Years of Liberty Street Economics



Looking Back at 10 Years of Liberty Street Economics

This month the Liberty Street Economics blog is celebrating its tenth anniversary. We first welcomed readers to Liberty Street on March 21, 2011 and since then our annual page views have grown from just over 260,000 to more than 3.3 million.

Continue reading "Looking Back at 10 Years of Liberty Street Economics" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Federal Reserve, Pandemic | Permalink | Comments (0)

March 01, 2021

Will Capital Flows through Global Banks Support Economic Recovery?



While policymakers around the world have aggressively and swiftly reacted to the common negative economic shock from COVID-19, the timing and forms of policy responses in the economic recovery stage may be more geographically differentiated. The range in policy responses, along with variations in the financial health of banks, likely will affect the flow of international credit through global banks. In this post, we ask whether, based on historical precedent, global banks are likely to provide additional support to the economic recovery in the locations they serve.

Continue reading "Will Capital Flows through Global Banks Support Economic Recovery? " »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Bank Capital, Banks, Credit, Financial Institutions, Pandemic | Permalink | Comments (1)

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Liberty Street Economics features insight and analysis from New York Fed economists working at the intersection of research and policy. Launched in 2011, the blog takes its name from the Bank’s headquarters at 33 Liberty Street in Manhattan’s Financial District.

The editors are Michael Fleming, Andrew Haughwout, Thomas Klitgaard, and Asani Sarkar, all economists in the Bank’s Research Group.

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