At the New York Fed: Conference on the Effects of Post-Crisis Banking Reforms   Liberty Street Economics
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June 19, 2018

At the New York Fed: Conference on the Effects of Post-Crisis Banking Reforms



The financial crisis of 2007-08 and the ensuing recession, the most severe since the 1930s, prompted a wave of regulatory reforms: tighter bank capital and liquidity rules, new failed bank resolution procedures, a stand-alone consumer protection agency, greater transparency in money market funds, central clearing of derivatives, and others as well. As these reforms have gradually taken effect, a healthy debate has emerged in the policy and academic communities over their efficacy in achieving their intended goals and possible unintended consequences.

On Friday, June 22, the New York Fed will host a conference featuring research conducted by its staff intended to contribute to this debate. The twelve studies were designed to carefully identify how key elements of the new regulatory regime and post-crisis reforms have affected bank risk-taking, funding costs and profitability, and market liquidity. The studies consider a wide set of regulatory changes, including the introduction of liquidity regulation, living wills, the supplemental leverage ratio, market value accounting to measure bank capital, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, among others. A distinguished panel of experts and academics will discuss the papers. Daniel K. Tarullo, former Federal Reserve Board member overseeing the Fed’s financial regulatory reforms and current visiting professor of law at Harvard Law School, will deliver the keynote speech.


Disclaimer
The views expressed in this post are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York or the Federal Reserve System. Any errors or omissions are the responsibility of the authors.





Crump_richardRichard Crump is an assistant vice president in the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s Research and Statistics Group.


Santos_joaoJoão Santos is a senior vice president in the Bank’s Research and Statistics Group.


How to cite this blog post:
Richard Crump and João Santos, “At the New York Fed: Conference on the Effects of Post-Crisis Banking Reforms,” Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics (blog), June 19, 2018, https://libertystreeteconomics.newyorkfed.org/2018/06/at-the-new-york-fed-conference-on-the-effects-of-post-crisis-banking-reforms.html.
Posted by Blog Author at 07:00:00 AM in Banks, Regulation
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