Liberty Street Economics
July 20, 2015

Just Released: The U.S. Treasury Market on October 15, 2014

The $12.7 trillion U.S. Treasury market plays a critical role in the global economy, serving as the primary means of financing the U.S. government, a risk-free benchmark for other financial instruments, and a key venue for the Federal Reserve’s implementation of monetary policy.

Have Dealers’ Strategies in the GCF Repo® Market Changed?

In a previous post, “Mapping and Sizing the U.S. Repo Market,” our colleagues described the structure of the U.S. repurchase agreement (repo) market.

July 17, 2015

The Effect of the Strong Dollar on U.S. Growth

The recent strengthening of the U.S. dollar has raised concerns about its impact on U.S. GDP growth.

July 15, 2015

A Discussion of Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century: Does More Capital Increase Inequality?

My aim in the second post of this series on Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century is to talk about the economist’s research accomplishment in reconstructing capital-output ratios for developed countries from the Industrial Revolution to the present and using them to explain why wealth inequality will rise in developed countries.

July 14, 2015

Historical Echoes: The Woman Who Would Be Bank

Mary Roebling (1904-94) was the first woman to serve as president of a major U.S. bank.

Posted at 7:00 am in Historical Echoes | Permalink | Comments (0)
July 13, 2015

The Survey of Consumer Expectations Turns Two!

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s Survey of Consumer Expectations (SCE) turned two years old in June.

A Discussion of Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century: By How Much Is r Greater than g?

Maxim Pinkovskiy describes the arguments that Thomas Piketty makes to conclude that wealth inequality will rise and that global capital taxation is needed to stop it, and offers a critical discussion of the arguments.

July 10, 2015

Historical Echoes: The Year of the . . . Pigeon?

One could say that Sesame Street character Bert’s extreme interest in paper clips is misguided, but his obsession with pigeons? Maybe not so much. Pigeons have played a role in financial history, with one such role described by Tony Chen during his walking tour of the Hutong district in Beijing.

Posted at 7:00 am in Historical Echoes | Permalink | Comments (0)
July 8, 2015

How Sensitive Is Housing Demand to Down Payment Requirements and Mortgage Rates?

When a household is looking to buy a home, financial considerations are usually very important.

July 6, 2015

Will Silicon Alley Be the Next Silicon Valley?

Jason Bram and Matthew Ploenzke Update: We broadened our definition of Silicon Valley and present more complete data on that region’s trends in the comments section of this post. In the body of the piece, we also corrected the NAICS code for Scientific R&D Services. For at least the past few decades, New York City’s […]

Posted at 7:00 am in Regional Analysis | Permalink | Comments (5)
About the Blog

Liberty Street Economics features insight and analysis from New York Fed economists working at the intersection of research and policy. Launched in 2011, the blog takes its name from the Bank’s headquarters at 33 Liberty Street in Manhattan’s Financial District.

The editors are Michael Fleming, Andrew Haughwout, Thomas Klitgaard, and Asani Sarkar, all economists in the Bank’s Research Group.

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