Liberty Street Economics
September 28, 2012

Historical Echoes: Policymakers Gone Fishin’–The Beginnings of the Fed’s Jackson Hole Symposium

The Jackson Hole symposium (meeting, conference, summit) is referred to every which way in the media and even by Fed people themselves.

Posted at 7:00 am in Historical Echoes | Permalink | Comments (0)
September 26, 2012

Just Released: August Indexes of Coincident Economic Indicators Show Uneven Growth across the Region

The August Indexes of Coincident Economic Indicators (CEIs) for New York State, New York City, and New Jersey, released today, give a mixed picture of current economic performance across the region.

Rebalancing the Economy in Response to Fiscal Consolidation

According to the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), under current policies the ratio of federal debt held by the public over gross domestic product—the debt-to-GDP ratio—will rise rapidly over the next decade.

September 24, 2012

How Much Can Refinancing Reduce the Risk of Mortgage Defaults?

Improving the ability of homeowners to take advantage of prevailing low mortgage rates by refinancing has remained an active topic of discussion.

Posted at 7:00 am in Housing, Mortgages | Permalink | Comments (2)
September 21, 2012

Historical Echoes: 150 Years after the Morrill Act

One hundred and fifty years ago, the Morrill Act was signed into law, transforming the face of American higher education.

Posted at 7:00 am in Historical Echoes | Permalink | Comments (0)
September 19, 2012

Soaring Tuitions: Are Public Funding Cuts to Blame?

Public colleges and universities play a vital role in training a state’s workforce, yet state support for higher education has been declining for years.

September 17, 2012

The Odd Behavior of Repo Haircuts during the Financial Crisis

Since the financial crisis began, there’s been substantial debate on the role of haircuts in U.S. repo markets.

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Liberty Street Economics features insight and analysis from New York Fed economists working at the intersection of research and policy. Launched in 2011, the blog takes its name from the Bank’s headquarters at 33 Liberty Street in Manhattan’s Financial District.

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