Liberty Street Economics
July 22, 2013

Just Released: Mapping Changes in School Finances

This morning, the New York Fed released a set of interactive maps and charts illuminating school finances in New York and New Jersey.

Distressed Residential Real Estate: Dimensions, Impacts, and Remedies

On October 5, 2012, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and the Rockefeller Institute of Government co-hosted the conference “Distressed Residential Real Estate: Dimensions, Impacts, and Remedies.”

July 19, 2013

Historical Echoes: “Happy Days” and Little Green Pieces of Paper

In 1965, Baby-Boomer kids may have been treated to TV footage of a high-stepping chorus line and thousands of people cheering to the background tune “Happy Days Are Here Again.”

Posted at 7:00 am in Historical Echoes | Permalink | Comments (0)
July 17, 2013

Magnifying the Risk of Fire Sales in the Tri-Party Repo Market

The fragility inherent in the tri-party repo market came to light during the 2008-09 financial crisis.

July 15, 2013

Improving Access to Refinancing Opportunities for Underwater Mortgages

Since the onset of the housing crisis, a focus of policymakers has been to help underwater homeowners lower their monthly mortgage payments by refinancing, principally through the Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP).

Posted at 7:00 am in Housing, Mortgages | Permalink | Comments (4)
July 12, 2013

Historical Echoes: Andy Warhol and the Art of Money

Money has been a topic of keen interest throughout history.

Posted at 7:00 am in Historical Echoes | Permalink | Comments (0)
July 10, 2013

Common Stock Repurchases during the Financial Crisis

Beverly Hirtle Large bank holding companies (BHCs) continued to pay dividends to their shareholders well after the onset of the recent financial crisis. Academics, industry analysts, and policymakers have noted that these payments reduced capital at these firms at a time when there was considerable uncertainty about the full extent of losses facing individual banks […]

Posted at 7:00 am in Financial Institutions | Permalink | Comments (0)
July 8, 2013

Do Bank Shocks Affect Aggregate Investment?

Traditionally, we have thought of the fates of specific banks as perhaps symptomatic of problems in the financial market but not as causal determinants of fluctuations in aggregate investment and other real economic activity.

About the Blog

Liberty Street Economics features insight and analysis from New York Fed economists working at the intersection of research and policy. Launched in 2011, the blog takes its name from the Bank’s headquarters at 33 Liberty Street in Manhattan’s Financial District.

The editors are Michael Fleming, Andrew Haughwout, Thomas Klitgaard, and Asani Sarkar, all economists in the Bank’s Research Group.

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