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55 posts on "Expectations"

May 15, 2019

Did Changes in Economic Expectations Foreshadow Swings in the 2018 Elections?



Second of two posts
Did Changes in Economic Expectations Foreshadow Swings in the 2018 Elections?

In the months leading up to the 2018 midterm elections, were economic expectations in congressional districts about to elect a Republican similar to those in districts about to elect a Democrat? How did economic expectations evolve in districts where the party holding the House seat would switch? After examining the persistence of polarization in expectations using voting patterns from the presidential election in our previous post, we explore here how divergence in expectations may have foreshadowed the results of the midterm elections. Using the Survey of Consumer Expectations, we show that economic expectations deteriorated between 2016 and 2018 in districts that switched from Republican to Democratic control compared to districts that remained Republican.

Continue reading "Did Changes in Economic Expectations Foreshadow Swings in the 2018 Elections?" »

May 13, 2019

Economic Expectations Grow Less Polarized since the 2016 Election



First of two posts
LSE_2019_polarization_neubauer_460

In two previous blog posts (from January 2017 and December 2017), we examined political polarization in economic expectations in the period immediately after the 2016 presidential election using the Survey of Consumer Expectations (SCE). Today, we begin a two-part series that revisits the issue. In this post, we provide an update on how economic expectations have evolved in counties where a plurality voted for Donald Trump in 2016 and counties where a plurality voted for Hillary Clinton. In a second post, we will look at how economic expectations differed in the run-up to the 2018 congressional elections, based on how districts ended up voting in that election.

Continue reading "Economic Expectations Grow Less Polarized since the 2016 Election" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Expectations | Permalink | Comments (0)

March 27, 2019

Expecting the Unexpected: Job Losses and Household Spending



LSE_Expecting the Unexpected: Job Losses and Household Spending

Unemployment risk constitutes one of the most significant sources of uncertainty facing workers in the United States. A large body of work has carefully documented that job loss may have long-term effects on one’s career, depressing earnings by as much as 20 percent after fifteen to twenty years. Given the severity of a job loss for earnings, an important question is how much such an event affects one’s standard of living during a spell of unemployment. This blog post explores how unemployment and expectations of job loss interact to affect household spending.

Continue reading "Expecting the Unexpected: Job Losses and Household Spending" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Expectations, Labor Market, Macroecon, Unemployment | Permalink | Comments (3)

February 27, 2019

Global Trends in Interest Rates



LSE_2019_Global Trends in Interest Rates

Long-term government bond yields are at their lowest levels of the past 150 years in advanced economies. In this blog post, we argue that this low-interest-rate environment reflects secular global forces that have lowered real interest rates by about two percentage points over the past forty years. The magnitude of this decline has been nearly the same in all advanced economies, since their real interest rates have converged over this period. The key factors behind this development are an increase in demand for safety and liquidity among investors and a slowdown in global economic growth.

Continue reading "Global Trends in Interest Rates" »

February 19, 2019

Just Released: Introducing the SCE Household Spending Survey



Introducing the SCE Household Spending Survey

Today we are releasing new data on individuals’ experiences and expectations regarding household spending. These data have been collected every four months since December 2014 as part of our Survey of Consumer Expectations (SCE). The goal of this blog post is to introduce the SCE Household Spending Survey and highlight some of its features.

Continue reading "Just Released: Introducing the SCE Household Spending Survey" »

December 03, 2018

Just Released: A Closer Look at Recent Tightening in Consumer Credit



LSE_Just Released: A Closer Look at Recent Tightening in Consumer Credit


The Federal Reserve Bank of New York released results today from its October 2018 SCE Credit Access Survey, which provides information on consumers' experiences with and expectations about credit demand and credit access. The survey is fielded every four months and was previously fielded in June.

Continue reading "Just Released: A Closer Look at Recent Tightening in Consumer Credit" »

Posted by Blog Author at 11:00 AM in Credit, Demographics, Expectations, Household Finance, Mortgages | Permalink | Comments (2)

September 28, 2018

Just Released: Are Employer-to-Employer Transitions Yielding Wage Growth? It Depends on the Worker’s Level of Education



LSE_2018_Just Released: Are Employer-to-Employer Transitions Yielding Wage Growth? It Depends on the Worker’s Level of Education

The rate of employer-to-employer transitions and the average wage of full-time offers rose compared with a year ago, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s July 2018 SCE Labor Market Survey. Workers’ satisfaction with their promotion opportunities improved since July 2017, while their satisfaction with wage compensation retreated slightly. Regarding expectations, the average expected wage offer (conditional on receiving one) and the reservation wage—the lowest wage at which respondents would be willing to accept a new job—both increased. The expected likelihood of moving into unemployment over the next four months showed a small uptick, which was most pronounced for female respondents.

Continue reading "Just Released: Are Employer-to-Employer Transitions Yielding Wage Growth? It Depends on the Worker’s Level of Education" »

May 30, 2018

Good News, Leverage, and Sudden Stops



LSE_Good News, Leverage, and Sudden Stops


One of the major debates in open economy macroeconomics is the extent to which capital inflows are beneficial for growth. In principle, these flows allow countries to increase their consumption and investment spending beyond their income by enabling them to tap into foreign saving. Periods of such borrowing, however, are associated with large trade deficits, external debt accumulation, and, in some cases, overheating when these economies operate beyond their potential output level for an extended period of time. The relevant question in this context is whether the rate at which a country is taking on external debt has useful predictive information about financial crises.

Continue reading "Good News, Leverage, and Sudden Stops" »

April 18, 2018

Just Released: Is Housing a Good Investment? Where You Stand Depends on Where You Sit



LSE_Just Released: Is Housing a Good Investment? Where You Stand Depends on Where You Sit

Home price growth expectations remained stable relative to last year, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s 2018 SCE Housing Survey. Respondents expect mortgage rates to rise over the next year, and perhaps as a result, the share of owners who expect to refinance their mortgages over the next year declined slightly. In addition, homeowners view themselves as more likely to make investments in their homes, and renters’ perceived access to mortgage credit has tightened somewhat. Although the majority of households continue to view housing as a good financial investment, there are some persistent and large differences across regions in the pervasiveness of this view, as this post will discuss.

Continue reading "Just Released: Is Housing a Good Investment? Where You Stand Depends on Where You Sit" »

Posted by Blog Author at 11:00 AM in Expectations, Housing | Permalink | Comments (0)

February 13, 2018

Just Released: Great Recession’s Impact Lingers in Hardest-Hit Regions



LSE_2018_Just Released: Great Recession’s Impact Lingers in Hardest-Hit Regions

The New York Fed’s Center for Microeconomic Data today released our Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit for the fourth quarter of 2017. Along with this report, we have posted an update of state-level data on balances and delinquencies for 2017. Overall aggregate debt balances increased again, with growth in all types of balances except for home equity lines of credit. In our post on the first quarter of 2017 we reported that overall balances had surpassed their peak set in the third quarter of 2008—the result of a slow but steady climb from several years of sharp deleveraging during the Great Recession.

Continue reading "Just Released: Great Recession’s Impact Lingers in Hardest-Hit Regions" »

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Liberty Street Economics features insight and analysis from New York Fed economists working at the intersection of research and policy. Launched in 2011, the blog takes its name from the Bank’s headquarters at 33 Liberty Street in Manhattan’s Financial District.

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