Liberty Street Economics
October 31, 2012

In a Relationship: Evidence of Underwriters’ Efforts to Stabilize the Share Price in the Facebook IPO

Stocks are usually offered in initial public offerings (IPOs) at a discount, leading to large first-day IPO returns.

Posted at 7:00 am in Corporate Finance | Permalink | Comments (0)
October 29, 2012

Weakness in the U.S. IPO Market

The high valuations achieved by recent social-media- and Internet-related initial public offerings (IPOs) and their disappointing aftermarket performance have rekindled the specter of the dot-com boom and bust of the late 1990s.

Posted at 7:00 am in Corporate Finance | Permalink | Comments (0)
October 15, 2012

The Minimum Balance at Risk: A Proposal to Stabilize Money Market Funds

In a June post, we explained why the design of money market funds (MMFs) makes them prone to runs and thereby contributes to financial instability. Today, we outline a proposal for strengthening MMFs that we’ve put forward in a recent New York Fed staff report.

October 12, 2012

Historical Echoes: It’s Not Easy Being Green

COLOURlovers is a website for people obsessed with color and design.

Posted at 7:00 am in Historical Echoes | Permalink | Comments (0)
October 10, 2012

Tracking the U.S. Banking Industry

The New York Fed has recently published the first edition of a new quarterly report tracking the aggregate financial condition of consolidated U.S. banking organizations. In this post, we describe the methodology used to construct the statistics in the report as well as present and briefly discuss some of the findings.

October 5, 2012

Historical Echoes: “Too Big to Fail” Is One Big Phrase

It’s a book! It’s an HBO film! It’s a T-shirt! It’s the subject of one of the two top quotes of 2009!

Posted at 7:00 am in Historical Echoes | Permalink | Comments (0)
October 3, 2012

The New Bank Resolution Regimes and “Too-Big-to-Fail”

During the recent financial crisis, the absence of an orderly resolution regime forced governments of several countries to provide extraordinary support to a number of systemically important financial institutions (SIFIs) that were considered “too-big-to-fail.”

October 1, 2012

Is U.S. Monetary Policy Seasonal?

Many economic time series display periodic and predictable patterns within each calendar year, generally referred to as seasonal effects.

About the Blog

Liberty Street Economics features insight and analysis from New York Fed economists working at the intersection of research and policy. Launched in 2011, the blog takes its name from the Bank’s headquarters at 33 Liberty Street in Manhattan’s Financial District.

The editors are Michael Fleming, Andrew Haughwout, Thomas Klitgaard, and Asani Sarkar, all economists in the Bank’s Research Group.

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