Liberty Street Economics
June 29, 2015

What Do Rating Agencies Think about “Too-Big-to-Fail” Since Dodd-Frank?

Did the Dodd-Frank Act end ‘‘too-big-to-fail’’(TBTF)?

June 26, 2015

From the Vault: Gauging Treasury Market Liquidity

A review of recent work on Liberty Street Economics examining liquidity in the U.S. Treasury market

Posted at 7:00 am in Financial Markets, Treasury | Permalink | Comments (1)
June 24, 2015
June 22, 2015

Just Released: U.S. Economy in a Snapshot

The Research Group at the New York Fed would like to announce the publication of US Economy in a Snapshot[RR1] .

Posted at 10:00 am in Macroecon | Permalink | Comments (0)

Becoming a Large Bank? It’s Not Easy

Rajlakshmi De and Hamid Mehran Size is usually seen as the leading indication of the costs that a bank failure would impose on society. As a result, the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010 requires banks to have adequate capital and liquidity to mitigate default risk and imposes additional requirements on larger banks to enhance their safety. […]

June 8, 2015

The Myth of First-Quarter Residual Seasonality

The current policy debate is influenced by the possibility that the first-quarter GDP data were affected by “residual seasonality.”

Is Cheaper Oil Good News or Bad News for U.S. Economy?

Oil prices have declined substantially since the summer of 2014.

June 5, 2015

Crisis Chronicles: Railway Mania, the Hungry Forties, and the Commercial Crisis of 1847

Money was plentiful in the United Kingdom in 1842, and with low yields on government bonds and railway shares paying handsome dividends, the desire to speculate spread—as one observer put it, “the contagion passed to all, and from the clerk to the capitalist the fever reigned uncontrollable and uncontrolled” (Francis’s History of the Bank of England).

June 3, 2015

Does Business Training Work?

Leaders of both developing and advanced economies believe that encouraging the development of small businesses will lead to job creation and economic growth.

Posted at 7:00 am in Labor Economics | Permalink | Comments (0)
June 1, 2015

What Drives Buyout Booms and Busts?

Valentin Haddad, Erik Loualiche, and Matthew Plosser Buyout activity by financial investors fluctuates substantially over time. In the United States, peak years result in close to one hundred public-to-private buyout transactions and trough years in as few as ten. The typical buyout is primarily funded by debt, hence the term “leveraged buyout” (or LBO). As […]

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