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58 posts on "Liquidity"

July 17, 2019

How Do Large Banks Manage Their Cash?



Second of two posts
How Do Large Banks Manage Their Cash?

As the aggregate supply of reserves shrinks and large banks implement liquidity regulations, they may follow a variety of liquidity management strategies depending on their business models and the interest rate differences between alternative liquid instruments. For example, the banks may continue to hold large amounts of excess reserves or shift to Treasury or agency securities or shrink their balance sheets. In this post, we provide new evidence on how large banks have managed their cash, which is the largest component of reserves, on a daily basis since the implementation of liquidity regulations.

Continue reading "How Do Large Banks Manage Their Cash?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Banks, Federal Reserve, Liquidity, Regulation, Repo, Treasury | Permalink | Comments (2)

July 15, 2019

Large Bank Cash Balances and Liquidity Regulations



Update (9 a.m.): An earlier version of this post transposed line labels in the first figure. The error has been corrected.

First of two posts
Large Bank Cash Balances and Liquidity Regulations

The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) has recently communicated its aim to continue implementing monetary policy in a regime that maintains an ample supply of reserves, though with a significantly lower level of reserves than has prevailed in recent years. The liquidity needs of the largest U.S. commercial banks play an important role in understanding the banking system’s appetite for actual reserve holdings, which we refer to as bank reserve demand. In this post, we discuss the recent evolution of large bank cash balances and the effect of liquidity regulations on these balances. In part two of this series, we provide new evidence on how the largest banks manage their liquidity needs on a daily basis.

Continue reading "Large Bank Cash Balances and Liquidity Regulations" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Banks, Federal Reserve, Fire Sale, Liquidity, Regulation | Permalink | Comments (1)

March 06, 2019

Assessing the Price Impact of Treasury Market Workups



LSE_2019_Assessing the Price Impact of Treasury Market Workups

The price impact of a trade derives largely from its information content. The “workup” mechanism, a trading protocol used in the U.S. Treasury securities market, is designed to mitigate the instantaneous price impact of a trade by allowing market participants to trade additional quantities of a security after a buyer and seller first agree on its price. Nevertheless, workup trades are not necessarily free of information. In this post, we assess the role of workups in price discovery, following our recent paper in the Review of Asset Pricing Studies (an earlier version of which was released as a New York Fed staff report).

Continue reading "Assessing the Price Impact of Treasury Market Workups" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Fed Funds, Financial Markets, Liquidity, Treasury | Permalink | Comments (1)

February 27, 2019

Global Trends in Interest Rates



LSE_2019_Global Trends in Interest Rates

Long-term government bond yields are at their lowest levels of the past 150 years in advanced economies. In this blog post, we argue that this low-interest-rate environment reflects secular global forces that have lowered real interest rates by about two percentage points over the past forty years. The magnitude of this decline has been nearly the same in all advanced economies, since their real interest rates have converged over this period. The key factors behind this development are an increase in demand for safety and liquidity among investors and a slowdown in global economic growth.

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February 25, 2019

What Can We Learn from the Timing of Interbank Payments?



LSE_What Can We Learn from the Timing of Interbank Payments?

From 2008 to 2014 the Federal Reserve vastly increased the size of its balance sheet, mainly through its large-scale asset purchase programs (LSAPs). The resulting abundance of reserves affected the financial system in a number of ways, including by changing the intraday timing of interbank payments. In this post we show that (1) there appears to be a nonlinear relationship between the amount of reserves in the system and the timing of interbank payments, and (2) with the increase in reserves, smaller banks shifted their timing of payments more significantly than larger banks did. This result suggests that tracking the timing of payments sent by banks could provide an informative signal about the impact of the shrinking Federal Reserve balance sheet on the payments system.

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Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Banks, Crisis, Liquidity | Permalink | Comments (1)

February 20, 2019

Stressed Outflows and the Supply of Central Bank Reserves



LSE_Stressed Outflows and the Supply of Central Bank Reserves

Since the financial crisis, banking regulators around the world have been intensely aware of liquidity risk and, in part as a response, have introduced the Basel III liquidity regulation. Today, the world’s largest banks hold substantial liquidity buffers comprising both securities and central bank reserves, to satisfy internal liquidity stress tests and minimum quantitative regulatory requirements. The appropriate level of liquidity buffers depends on the likely outflows in a market stress situation. In this post, we use public data to provide a rough estimate of stressed outflows that the largest banks would face and consider how they could meet these outflows.

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Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Banks, Federal Reserve, Liquidity | Permalink | Comments (1)

February 19, 2019

Just Released: Introducing the SCE Household Spending Survey



Introducing the SCE Household Spending Survey

Today we are releasing new data on individuals’ experiences and expectations regarding household spending. These data have been collected every four months since December 2014 as part of our Survey of Consumer Expectations (SCE). The goal of this blog post is to introduce the SCE Household Spending Survey and highlight some of its features.

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January 14, 2019

Creditor Recovery in Lehman’s Bankruptcy



Second of five posts
LSE_Creditor Recovery in Lehman’s Bankruptcy

Expectations of creditor recovery were low when the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy process started. On the day the firm filed for bankruptcy in September 2008, the average price of Lehman’s senior bonds implied a recovery rate of about 30 percent for senior creditors. A month later the bond price was implying a recovery rate of 9 percent, consistent with results from Lehman’s CDS auction. Two and a half years later, Lehman’s estate estimated that the recovery rate for holding company creditors would be just 16 percent. So, ten years after the filing, how much did creditors actually recover?

Continue reading "Creditor Recovery in Lehman’s Bankruptcy" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:02 AM in Banks, Crisis, Fire Sale, Liquidity | Permalink | Comments (0)

December 05, 2018

Price Impact of Trades and Limit Orders in the U.S. Treasury Securities Market



LSE_Price Impact of Trades and Limit Orders in the U.S. Treasury Securities Market


It’s long been known that asset prices respond not only to public information, such as macroeconomic announcements, but also to private information revealed through trading. More recently, with the growth of high-frequency trading, academics have argued that limit orders—orders to buy or sell a security at a specific price or better—also contain information. In this post, we examine the information content of trades and limit orders in the U.S. Treasury securities market, following this paper, recently published in the Journal of Financial Markets and earlier as a New York Fed staff report.

Continue reading "Price Impact of Trades and Limit Orders in the U.S. Treasury Securities Market" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:01 AM in Financial Markets, Liquidity | Permalink | Comments (0)

October 15, 2018

Did Banks Subject to LCR Reduce Liquidity Creation?



LSE_2018_Did Banks Subject to LCR Reduce Liquidity Creation?

Banks traditionally provide loans that are funded mostly by deposits and thereby create liquidity, which benefits the economy. However, since the loans are typically long-term and illiquid, whereas the deposits are short-term and liquid, this creation of liquidity entails risk for the bank because of the possibility that depositors may “run” (that is, withdraw their deposits on short notice). To mitigate this risk, regulators implemented the liquidity coverage ratio (LCR) following the financial crisis of 2007-08, mandating banks to hold a buffer of liquid assets. A side effect of the regulation, however, is a reduction in liquidity creation by banks subject to LCR, as we find in our recent paper.

Continue reading "Did Banks Subject to LCR Reduce Liquidity Creation?" »

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