Liberty Street Economics -Liberty Street Economics
Liberty Street Economics
Return to Liberty Street Economics Home Page

62 posts on "Liquidity"

January 13, 2020

How Does Information Affect Liquidity in Over-the-Counter Markets?



How Does Information Affect Liquidity in Over-the-Counter Markets?

A large volume of financial transactions occur in decentralized markets that commonly depend on a network of dealers. Dealers face two impediments to providing liquidity in these markets. First, dealers may face informed traders. Second, they may face costs associated with maintaining large balance sheets, either due to inventory or liquidity costs. In a recent paper, we study a model of over-the-counter (OTC) markets in which liquidity is endogenously determined by dealers who must contend with both asymmetric information and liquidity costs. This post provides an intuitive explanation of our model and the dynamics of interdealer liquidity.

Continue reading "How Does Information Affect Liquidity in Over-the-Counter Markets?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Dealers, Liquidity | Permalink | Comments (0)

January 06, 2020

The Evolving Market for U.S. Sovereign Credit Risk



The Evolving Market for U.S. Sovereign Credit Risk

How should we measure market expectations of the U.S. government failing to meet its debt obligations and thereby defaulting? A natural candidate would be to use the spreads on U.S. sovereign single-name credit default swaps (CDS): since a CDS provides insurance to the buyer for the possibility of default, an increase in the CDS spread would indicate an increase in the market-perceived probability of a credit event occurring. In this post, we argue that aggregate measures of activity in U.S. sovereign CDS mask a decrease in risk-forming transactions after 2014. That is, quoted CDS spreads in this market are based on few, if any, market transactions and thus may be a misleading indicator of market expectations.

Continue reading "The Evolving Market for U.S. Sovereign Credit Risk" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Financial Markets, Liquidity | Permalink | Comments (1)

December 18, 2019

Banking System Vulnerability: Annual Update



Banking System Vulnerability: Annual Update

A key part of understanding the stability of the U.S. financial system is to monitor leverage and funding risks in the financial sector and the way in which these vulnerabilities interact to amplify negative shocks. In this post, we provide an update of four analytical models, introduced in a Liberty Street Economics post last year, that aim to capture different aspects of banking system vulnerability. Since their introduction, vulnerabilities as indicated by these models have increased moderately, continuing the slow but steady upward trend that started around 2016. Despite the recent increase, the overall level of vulnerabilities according to this analysis remains subdued and is still significantly smaller than before the financial crisis of 2008-09.

Continue reading "Banking System Vulnerability: Annual Update" »

November 13, 2019

The Side Effects of Shadow Banking on Liquidity Provision



Correction: When this post was first published, line labels in the panel showing Tier 1 capital ratios were reversed; the labels have been corrected. (November 13, 10:40 a.m.)

The Side Effects of Shadow Banking on Liquidity Provision

Over the past two decades, the growth of shadow banking has transformed the way the U.S. banking system funds corporations. In this post, we describe how this growth has affected both the term loan and credit line businesses, and how the changes have resulted in a reduction in the liquidity insurance provided to firms.

Continue reading "The Side Effects of Shadow Banking on Liquidity Provision" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Banks, Financial Institutions, Liquidity | Permalink | Comments (1)

July 17, 2019

How Do Large Banks Manage Their Cash?



Second of two posts
How Do Large Banks Manage Their Cash?

As the aggregate supply of reserves shrinks and large banks implement liquidity regulations, they may follow a variety of liquidity management strategies depending on their business models and the interest rate differences between alternative liquid instruments. For example, the banks may continue to hold large amounts of excess reserves or shift to Treasury or agency securities or shrink their balance sheets. In this post, we provide new evidence on how large banks have managed their cash, which is the largest component of reserves, on a daily basis since the implementation of liquidity regulations.

Continue reading "How Do Large Banks Manage Their Cash?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Banks, Federal Reserve, Liquidity, Regulation, Repo, Treasury | Permalink | Comments (2)

July 15, 2019

Large Bank Cash Balances and Liquidity Regulations



Update (9 a.m.): An earlier version of this post transposed line labels in the first figure. The error has been corrected.

First of two posts
Large Bank Cash Balances and Liquidity Regulations

The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) has recently communicated its aim to continue implementing monetary policy in a regime that maintains an ample supply of reserves, though with a significantly lower level of reserves than has prevailed in recent years. The liquidity needs of the largest U.S. commercial banks play an important role in understanding the banking system’s appetite for actual reserve holdings, which we refer to as bank reserve demand. In this post, we discuss the recent evolution of large bank cash balances and the effect of liquidity regulations on these balances. In part two of this series, we provide new evidence on how the largest banks manage their liquidity needs on a daily basis.

Continue reading "Large Bank Cash Balances and Liquidity Regulations" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Banks, Federal Reserve, Fire Sale, Liquidity, Regulation | Permalink | Comments (1)

March 06, 2019

Assessing the Price Impact of Treasury Market Workups



LSE_2019_Assessing the Price Impact of Treasury Market Workups

The price impact of a trade derives largely from its information content. The “workup” mechanism, a trading protocol used in the U.S. Treasury securities market, is designed to mitigate the instantaneous price impact of a trade by allowing market participants to trade additional quantities of a security after a buyer and seller first agree on its price. Nevertheless, workup trades are not necessarily free of information. In this post, we assess the role of workups in price discovery, following our recent paper in the Review of Asset Pricing Studies (an earlier version of which was released as a New York Fed staff report).

Continue reading "Assessing the Price Impact of Treasury Market Workups" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Fed Funds, Financial Markets, Liquidity, Treasury | Permalink | Comments (1)

February 27, 2019

Global Trends in Interest Rates



LSE_2019_Global Trends in Interest Rates

Long-term government bond yields are at their lowest levels of the past 150 years in advanced economies. In this blog post, we argue that this low-interest-rate environment reflects secular global forces that have lowered real interest rates by about two percentage points over the past forty years. The magnitude of this decline has been nearly the same in all advanced economies, since their real interest rates have converged over this period. The key factors behind this development are an increase in demand for safety and liquidity among investors and a slowdown in global economic growth.

Continue reading "Global Trends in Interest Rates" »

February 25, 2019

What Can We Learn from the Timing of Interbank Payments?



LSE_What Can We Learn from the Timing of Interbank Payments?

From 2008 to 2014 the Federal Reserve vastly increased the size of its balance sheet, mainly through its large-scale asset purchase programs (LSAPs). The resulting abundance of reserves affected the financial system in a number of ways, including by changing the intraday timing of interbank payments. In this post we show that (1) there appears to be a nonlinear relationship between the amount of reserves in the system and the timing of interbank payments, and (2) with the increase in reserves, smaller banks shifted their timing of payments more significantly than larger banks did. This result suggests that tracking the timing of payments sent by banks could provide an informative signal about the impact of the shrinking Federal Reserve balance sheet on the payments system.

Continue reading "What Can We Learn from the Timing of Interbank Payments?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Banks, Crisis, Liquidity | Permalink | Comments (1)

February 20, 2019

Stressed Outflows and the Supply of Central Bank Reserves



LSE_Stressed Outflows and the Supply of Central Bank Reserves

Since the financial crisis, banking regulators around the world have been intensely aware of liquidity risk and, in part as a response, have introduced the Basel III liquidity regulation. Today, the world’s largest banks hold substantial liquidity buffers comprising both securities and central bank reserves, to satisfy internal liquidity stress tests and minimum quantitative regulatory requirements. The appropriate level of liquidity buffers depends on the likely outflows in a market stress situation. In this post, we use public data to provide a rough estimate of stressed outflows that the largest banks would face and consider how they could meet these outflows.

Continue reading "Stressed Outflows and the Supply of Central Bank Reserves" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Banks, Federal Reserve, Liquidity | Permalink | Comments (1)
About the Blog
Liberty Street Economics features insight and analysis from New York Fed economists working at the intersection of research and policy. Launched in 2011, the blog takes its name from the Bank’s headquarters at 33 Liberty Street in Manhattan’s Financial District.

The editors are Michael Fleming, Andrew Haughwout, Thomas Klitgaard, and Asani Sarkar, all economists in the Bank’s Research Group.

The views expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the position of the New York Fed or the Federal Reserve System.


Economic Research Tracker

Liberty Street Economics is now available on the iPhone® and iPad® and can be customized by economic research topic or economist.


Most Viewed

Last 12 Months
Useful Links
Comment Guidelines
We encourage your comments and queries on our posts and will publish them (below the post) subject to the following guidelines:
Please be brief: Comments are limited to 1500 characters.
Please be quick: Comments submitted after COB on Friday will not be published until Monday morning.
Please be aware: Comments submitted shortly before or during the FOMC blackout may not be published until after the blackout.
Please be on-topic and patient: Comments are moderated and will not appear until they have been reviewed to ensure that they are substantive and clearly related to the topic of the post. We reserve the right not to post any comment, and will not post comments that are abusive, harassing, obscene, or commercial in nature. No notice will be given regarding whether a submission will or will not be posted.‎
Disclosure Policy
The LSE editors ask authors submitting a post to the blog to confirm that they have no conflicts of interest as defined by the American Economic Association in its Disclosure Policy. If an author has sources of financial support or other interests that could be perceived as influencing the research presented in the post, we disclose that fact in a statement prepared by the author and appended to the author information at the end of the post. If the author has no such interests to disclose, no statement is provided. Note, however, that we do indicate in all cases if a data vendor or other party has a right to review a post.
Archives