Liberty Street Economics
May 30, 2014

Historical Echoes: Aye, That Piece of Eight You Be Thinkin’ of Were a Precursor to Today’s Dollar

Why do we associate pieces of eight with pirates?

Posted at 7:00 am in Historical Echoes | Permalink | Comments (2)
May 28, 2014

Rising Household Debt: Increasing Demand or Increasing Supply?

Total consumer debt continued to increase in the first quarter of this year, marking the first time since the recession that aggregate debt had grown for three consecutive quarters, according to the May 2014 Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit.

May 23, 2014

Historical Echoes: The Trouble with Money

“The trouble with money,” said a Federal Reserve Bank of New York publication in the 1960s, “as with all material things in the world, is that it does not last forever.”

Posted at 7:00 am in Historical Echoes | Permalink | Comments (1)
May 21, 2014

Just Released: What Kinds of Jobs Have Been Created during the Recovery?

At today’s regional economic press briefing, we provided an update on economic conditions in New York, northern New Jersey, and Puerto Rico, with a special focus on the kinds of jobs that have been created in each of these places during the recovery.

Why U.S. Exporters Use Letters of Credit

Banks play a critical role in international trade by offering letters of credit (LCs) that substantially reduce the risk faced by exporters.

May 19, 2014

The Trade Finance Business of U.S. Banks

Banks facilitate international trade by providing financing and guarantees to importers and exporters.

May 16, 2014

Just Released: The New York Fed Staff Forecast—May 2014

Today, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York (FRBNY) is hosting the spring meeting of its Economic Advisory Panel (EAP).

Will the United States Benefit from the Trans-Pacific Partnership?

U.S. involvement in what could be one of the world’s largest free trade agreements, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), has garnered a lot of attention, especially since the entry of Japan into negotiations last year.

May 14, 2014

When Are Equity Investors Paid to Take Risk?

Most gauges of “the” equity risk premium have declined since the financial crisis but remain elevated, even as broad market indexes near record highs.

Posted at 7:00 am in Financial Markets | Permalink | Comments (3)
May 13, 2014

Just Released: Young Student Loan Borrowers Remained on the Sidelines of the Housing Market in 2013

Last year, our blog presented results from the FRBNY Consumer Credit Panel (CCP) indicating that, at a time of unprecedented growth in student debt, student borrowers were collectively retreating from housing and auto markets. In this post, we compare our 2012 findings to the news for 2013.

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Liberty Street Economics features insight and analysis from New York Fed economists working at the intersection of research and policy. Launched in 2011, the blog takes its name from the Bank’s headquarters at 33 Liberty Street in Manhattan’s Financial District.

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