Liberty Street Economics
October 24, 2014

At the N.Y. Fed: Macroeconomic Policy Mix in the Transatlantic Economy

The reasons why the macroeconomic policy mix has been different on the two sides of the Atlantic in recent years remain a hotly debated issue.

Posted at 7:00 am in Euro Area, Fed Funds, Macroecon | Permalink | Comments (0)
October 20, 2014

Don’t Be Late! The Importance of Timely Settlement of Tri-Party Repo Contracts

Tri-party repo is popular among securities dealers as a way to raise short-term funding.

October 17, 2014

New York City’s Not-So-Outer Boroughs

Ever since the first census of the U.S. population was taken, back in 1790, New York City has been the nation’s largest city, and for most of this time by a factor of more than two.

October 15, 2014

How Do Liquidity Conditions Affect U.S. Bank Lending?

he recent financial crisis underscored the importance of understanding how liquidity conditions for banks (or other financial institutions) influence the banks’ lending to domestic and foreign customers.

October 10, 2014

Historical Echoes: “Burns Money” on What’s My Line?

In a May 2014 Historical Echoes post, Marja Vitti describes what happened to money too old to be left in circulation: it was incinerated by the Federal Reserve Banks until passage of the Clean Air Act of 1970, after which the money was shredded.

Posted at 7:00 am in Historical Echoes | Permalink | Comments (0)
October 8, 2014

Demographic Trends and Growth in Japan and the United States

Japan’s population is shrinking and getting older, with the population falling at a 0.2 percent rate this year, and the working-age population (ages 16 to 64), falling at a much faster rate of almost 1.5 percent.

October 6, 2014

What Can We Learn from Prior Periods of Low Volatility?

Volatility, a measure of how much financial markets are fluctuating, has been near its record low in many asset classes.

October 3, 2014

Crisis Chronicles: The Crisis of 1816, the Year without a Summer, and Sunspot Equilibria

In 1815, England emerged victorious after what had been nearly a quarter century of war with France.

October 1, 2014

Cross-Country Evidence on Transmission of Liquidity Risk through Global Banks

Over the past thirty years, the typical large bank has become a global entity with subsidiaries in many countries.

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Liberty Street Economics features insight and analysis from New York Fed economists working at the intersection of research and policy. Launched in 2011, the blog takes its name from the Bank’s headquarters at 33 Liberty Street in Manhattan’s Financial District.

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