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25 posts on "Central Bank"

May 17, 2019

Understanding Cyber Risk: Lessons from a Recent Fed Workshop



Understanding Cyber Risk: Lessons from a Recent Fed Workshop

Cyber risk poses a major threat to financial stability, yet financial institutions still lack consensus on the definition of and terminology around cyber risk and have no common framework for confronting these hazards. This impedes efforts to measure and manage such risk, diminishing institutions’ individual and collective readiness to handle system-level cyber threats. In this blog post, we describe the proceedings of a recent workshop where leading risk managers, academics, and policy makers gathered to discuss proposals for countering cyber risk. This workshop is part of a joint two-phase initiative run by the Federal Reserve Banks of Richmond and New York and the Fed’s Board of Governors to harmonize cyber risk identification, classification, and measurement practices.

Continue reading "Understanding Cyber Risk: Lessons from a Recent Fed Workshop" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Banks, Central Bank, Federal Reserve, Systemic Risk | Permalink | Comments (0)

May 08, 2019

Ten Years Later—Did QE Work?



Ten Years Later—Did QE Work?


By November 2008, the Global Financial Crisis, which originated in the residential housing market and the shadow banking system, had begun to turn into a major recession, spurring the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) to initiate what we now refer to as quantitative easing (QE). In this blog post, we draw upon the empirical findings of post-crisis academic research–including our own work–to shed light on the question: Did QE work?

Continue reading "Ten Years Later—Did QE Work?" »

May 06, 2019

Selected Deposits and the OBFR



Selected Deposits and the OBFR

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York recently decided to revise the composition of the Overnight Bank Funding Rate (OBFR), a reference rate measuring the cost banks face to borrow overnight in unsecured U.S. dollar-denominated money markets. Specifically, in addition to the federal funds and Eurodollar transactions currently comprising the OBFR, the OBFR now also includes overnight, interest-bearing demand deposits (at rates negotiated between the counterparties and excluding deposits payable on demand) booked within banks’ U.S. offices, known as “selected deposits.” In this post, we discuss the change in more detail, the reason for including selected deposits, and the likely impact on the OBFR’s published values.

Continue reading "Selected Deposits and the OBFR" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Central Bank, Fed Funds, Federal Reserve, Monetary Policy | Permalink | Comments (0)

February 27, 2019

Global Trends in Interest Rates



LSE_2019_Global Trends in Interest Rates

Long-term government bond yields are at their lowest levels of the past 150 years in advanced economies. In this blog post, we argue that this low-interest-rate environment reflects secular global forces that have lowered real interest rates by about two percentage points over the past forty years. The magnitude of this decline has been nearly the same in all advanced economies, since their real interest rates have converged over this period. The key factors behind this development are an increase in demand for safety and liquidity among investors and a slowdown in global economic growth.

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February 11, 2019

The U.S. Dollar’s Global Roles: Where Do Things Stand?



LSE_The U.S. Dollar’s Global Roles: Where Do Things Stand?

Previous
Liberty Street Economics analysis and New York Fed research addressed the potential implications for the United States if the dollar’s global role changed, noting that the currency might not retain its dominance forever. This post checks the status of the dollar, considering whether any erosion in the dollar’s international standing has occurred. The evidence to date is that the dollar remains the world’s dominant currency by broad margins. Alternatives have not gained extensive traction, albeit this does not rule out potential future pressures.

Continue reading "The U.S. Dollar’s Global Roles: Where Do Things Stand?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Central Bank, International Economics | Permalink | Comments (0)

January 18, 2019

Post-Crisis Financial Regulation: Experiences from Both Sides of the Atlantic



LSE_Post-Crisis Financial Regulation: Experiences from Both Sides of the Atlantic

To mark the 100-year anniversary of the Banca d’Italia’s New York office, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and the Banca d’Italia hosted a workshop on post-crisis financial regulation in November 2018. The goal of the workshop was to discuss differences in regulation between the United States and Europe (and around the globe more broadly), examine gaps in current regulations, identify challenges to be addressed, and raise awareness about the unintended consequences of regulation. The workshop included presentations by researchers from the U.S. and Europe on such topics as market liquidity, funding, and capital requirements. In this post, we present some of the findings and discussions from the workshop.

Continue reading "Post-Crisis Financial Regulation: Experiences from Both Sides of the Atlantic" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Banks, Central Bank, Crisis, Financial Intermediation | Permalink | Comments (0)

August 06, 2018

How Do the Fed's MBS Purchases Affect Credit Allocation?



LSE_How Do the Fed's MBS Purchases Affect Credit Allocation?

It is sometimes said that the Federal Reserve should not engage in “credit allocation.” But what does credit allocation actually mean? And how do current Fed policies affect the allocation of credit? In this post, we describe two separate ideas often associated with credit allocation. The first idea is that the Fed should not take credit risk, which taxpayers would ultimately have to bear. The second idea is that the Fed’s actions should not influence the flow of credit to particular sectors. We consider whether the Fed’s holdings of agency mortgage-backed securities (MBS) could affect the allocation of credit. In a companion post, we discuss how the economic effects of the Fed’s MBS holdings compare with the economic effects of more traditional holdings.

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Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Central Bank, Federal Reserve, Monetary Policy | Permalink | Comments (0)

July 11, 2018

Size Is Not All: Distribution of Bank Reserves and Fed Funds Dynamics



LSE_2018_Size Is Not All: Distribution of Bank Reserves and Fed Funds Dynamics

As a consequence of the Federal Reserve’s large-scale asset purchases from 2008-14, banks’ reserve balances at the Fed have increased dramatically, rising from $10 billion in March 2008 to more than $2 trillion currently. In that new environment of abundant reserves, the FOMC put in place a framework for controlling the fed funds rate, using the interest rate that it offered to banks and a different, lower interest rate that it offered to non-banks (and banks). Now that the Fed has begun to gradually reduce its asset holdings, aggregate reserves are shrinking as well, and an important question becomes: How does a change in the level of aggregate reserves affect trading in the fed funds market? In our recent paper, we show that the answer depends not just on the aggregate size of reserve balances, as is sometimes assumed, but also on how reserves are distributed among banks. In particular, we show that a measure of the typical trade in the market known as the effective fed funds rate (EFFR) could rise above the rate paid on banks’ reserve balances if reserves remain heavily concentrated at just a few banks.

Note: This analysis provides insight into how the fed funds market might react to changes in the aggregate level of bank reserves. However, as it does not account for all relevant factors, it should not be construed as an analysis of any specific time period. In particular, our analysis does not incorporate the technical adjustment introduced by the FOMC on June 13 that lowered the interest paid on banks' reserves relative to the top of the target range.

Continue reading "Size Is Not All: Distribution of Bank Reserves and Fed Funds Dynamics" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Banks, Central Bank, Fed Funds, Monetary Policy | Permalink | Comments (0)

April 16, 2018

Is Stigma Attached to the European Central Bank’s Marginal Lending Facility?



LSE_Is Stigma Attached to the European Central Bank’s Marginal Lending Facility?


The European Central Bank (ECB)’s marginal lending facility has been used by banks to borrow funds both in normal times and during the crisis that started in 2007. In this post, we argue that how a central bank communicates the purpose of a facility is important in determining how users of the facility are perceived. In particular, the ECB never refers to the marginal lending facility as a back-up source of funds. The ECB’s neutral approach may be a key factor in explaining why financial institutions are less reluctant to use the marginal lending facility than the Fed’s discount window.

Continue reading "Is Stigma Attached to the European Central Bank’s Marginal Lending Facility?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Central Bank, Euro Area, Lender of Last Resort | Permalink | Comments (1)

February 09, 2018

Hey, Economist! What Do Cryptocurrencies Have to Do with Trust?



LSE_Hey, Economist!  What Do Cryptocurrencies Have to Do with Trust?


Bitcoin and other “cryptocurrencies” have been much in the news lately, in part because of their wild gyrations in value. Michael Lee and Antoine Martin, economists in the New York Fed’s Money and Payment Studies function, have been following cryptocurrencies and agreed to answer some questions about digital money.

Continue reading "Hey, Economist! What Do Cryptocurrencies Have to Do with Trust?" »

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Liberty Street Economics features insight and analysis from New York Fed economists working at the intersection of research and policy. Launched in 2011, the blog takes its name from the Bank’s headquarters at 33 Liberty Street in Manhattan’s Financial District.

The editors are Michael Fleming, Andrew Haughwout, Thomas Klitgaard, and Asani Sarkar, all economists in the Bank’s Research Group.

The views expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the position of the New York Fed or the Federal Reserve System.


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