Liberty Street Economics
January 29, 2016

Just Released: New Web Feature Provides Timely Data on the Job Market for Recent College Graduates

Jaison R. Abel and Richard Deitz Many newly minted college graduates entering the labor market in the wake of the Great Recession have had a tough time finding good jobs. But just how difficult has it been, and are things getting better? And for which graduates? These questions can be difficult to answer because timely […]

Posted at 10:00 am in Education, Labor Economics | Permalink | Comments (0)
January 15, 2016

Crisis Chronicles: The Gold Panic of 1869, America’s First Black Friday

Wall Street in the late 1860s was a bare-knuckles affair plagued by robber barons, political patronage, and stock manipulation. In perhaps the most scandalous instance of manipulation ever, a cabal led by Jay Gould, a successful but ruthless railroad executive and speculator, and several highly placed political contacts, conspired to corner the gold market. Although ultimately foiled, they succeeded in bankrupting several venerable brokerage houses and crashing the stock market, causing America’s first Black Friday.

January 13, 2016

Fundamental Disagreement: How Much and Why?

Richard K. Crump and Stefano Eusepi Everyone disagrees, even professional forecasters, especially about big economic questions. Has potential output growth changed since the financial crisis? Are we bound for a period of “secular stagnation”? Will the European economy rebound? When is inflation getting back to mandate-consistent level? In this post, we document to what degree […]

Posted at 7:00 am in Forecasting, Macroecon | Permalink | Comments (0)
January 11, 2016

Working as a Barista After College Is Not as Common as You Might Think

Jaison R. Abel and Richard Deitz The image of a newly minted college graduate working behind the counter of a hip coffee shop has become a hallmark of the plight of recent college graduates following the Great Recession. Recurring news stories about young college graduates stuck in low-skilled jobs make it easy to see why […]

Posted at 7:00 am in Labor Economics, Wages | Permalink | Comments (0)
January 6, 2016

Hedging Income Fluctuations with Foreign Currency Assets

The world has gone through a process of financial globalization over the past two decades, with countries increasing their holdings of foreign assets and liabilities.

January 5, 2016

Who is Driving the Recent Decline in Consumer Inflation Expectations?

The expectations of U.S. consumers about inflation have declined to record lows over the past several months.

January 4, 2016

Characterizing the Rising Settlement Fails in Seasoned Treasury Securities

Michael J. Fleming and Frank M. Keane Note: Updated versions of the charts in this post showing data through March 31, 2016, can be viewed here. In a 2014 post, we described what settlement fails are, why they arise and matter, and how they can be measured. A subsequent post explored the determinants of the […]

Posted at 7:00 am in Financial Markets, Treasury | Permalink | Comments (0)
About the Blog

Liberty Street Economics features insight and analysis from New York Fed economists working at the intersection of research and policy. Launched in 2011, the blog takes its name from the Bank’s headquarters at 33 Liberty Street in Manhattan’s Financial District.

The editors are Michael Fleming, Andrew Haughwout, Thomas Klitgaard, and Asani Sarkar, all economists in the Bank’s Research Group.

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