Liberty Street Economics
March 30, 2015

The Effects of Entering and Exiting a Credit Default Swap Index

Since their inception in 2002, credit default swap (CDS) indexes have gained tremendous popularity and become leading barometers of the credit market.

March 27, 2015

Just Released: SCE Credit Access Survey Shows Higher Likelihood of Consumers Applying for Credit

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York today released results from its February 2015, which provides information on consumers’ experiences with and expectations about credit demand and credit access.

March 25, 2015

Choosing the Right Policy in Real Time (Why That’s Not Easy)

Marco Del Negro, Raiden B. Hasegawa, and Frank Schorfheide Second in a two-part series As an economist, you make policy recommendations at any point in time that depend on what model of the economy you have in mind and on your assessment of the state of the economy. One can see these points play out […]

March 23, 2015

Combining Models for Forecasting and Policy Analysis

Model uncertainty is pervasive. Economists, bloggers, policymakers all have different views of how the world works and what economic policies would make it better.

March 20, 2015

Just Released: Benchmark Revisions Paint a Brighter Picture of (Most of) the Regional Economy

Every March, the Bureau of Labor Statistics releases benchmark revisions of state and local payroll employment for the past year.

March 11, 2015

From the Vault: It’s CCAR Season

Ahead of the Federal Reserve’s release on Wednesday of 2015 bank stress tests results, we’ve seen a spike in traffic to a piece in our archive that offers a primer on the annual Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review (CCAR) process and background on its role as a tool in the Fed’s bank supervisory arsenal.

Posted at 7:00 am in Financial Markets | Permalink | Comments (0)
March 9, 2015

Herd Behavior in Financial Markets

Over the last twenty-five years, there has been a lot of interest in herd behavior in financial markets—that is, a trader’s decision to disregard his or her private information to follow the behavior of the crowd.

Posted at 7:00 am in Financial Markets | Permalink | Comments (1)
March 6, 2015

Just Released: Is Your School Spending Less Than Your Neighbor’s?

This morning, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York released a set of interactive visuals that present school spending and its various components—such as instructional spending, instructional support, leadership support, and building services spending—across all thirty-two Community School Districts (CSD) in New York City and map their progression over time.

Posted at 11:15 am in Education, Regional Analysis | Permalink | Comments (0)
March 5, 2015

From the Vault: Tracking Subprime Auto Loans

Recent news of banks scaling back on the issuance of car loans to borrowers with a weak credit history, coupled with recent media investigations into auto lending fraud, have drawn renewed attention to a surge in subprime auto lending.

Posted at 1:45 pm in Household Finance | Permalink | Comments (1)
March 4, 2015

No Guarantees, No Trade!

World trade fell 20 percent relative to world GDP in 2008 and 2009.

About the Blog

Liberty Street Economics features insight and analysis from New York Fed economists working at the intersection of research and policy. Launched in 2011, the blog takes its name from the Bank’s headquarters at 33 Liberty Street in Manhattan’s Financial District.

The editors are Michael Fleming, Andrew Haughwout, Thomas Klitgaard, and Asani Sarkar, all economists in the Bank’s Research Group.

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