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88 posts on "International Economics"

August 14, 2019

Are U.S. Tariffs Turning Vietnam into an Export Powerhouse?



Are U.S. Tariffs Turning Vietnam into an Export Powerhouse?

The imposition of Section 301 tariffs on about half of China’s exports to the United States has coincided with a fall in imports from China and gains for other countries. The U.S.-China trade conflict also appears to be accelerating an ongoing shift in foreign direct investment (FDI) from China to other emerging markets, particularly in Asia. Within the region, Vietnam is often cited as a clear beneficiary of these trends, a rising economy that could displace China, to some extent, in global supply chains. In this note, we examine the data and conclude that Vietnam is indeed gaining market share, but is too small to replace China anytime soon.

Continue reading "Are U.S. Tariffs Turning Vietnam into an Export Powerhouse?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in International Economics | Permalink | Comments (0)

August 07, 2019

Does a Data Quirk Inflate China’s Travel Services Deficit?



LSE_Does a Data Quirk Inflate China’s Travel Services Deficit?

Chinese residents are increasingly traveling to see the rest of the world, logging a total of 162 million foreign visits in 2018, up from 57 million in 2010. Increased travel spending by Chinese residents is acting to reduce the country's trade surplus because such spending is counted as a services import. However, there appears to be a quirk in the Chinese data that results in a significant understatement of the offsetting spending by visitors to China (a services export). According to other Chinese data, this understatement totaled $85 billion in 2018. If so, China's deficit in travel services is smaller than officially reported, and its trade surplus correspondingly larger.

Continue reading "Does a Data Quirk Inflate China’s Travel Services Deficit?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Balance of Payments, International Economics | Permalink | Comments (0)

May 23, 2019

New China Tariffs Increase Costs to U.S. Households



New China Tariffs Increase Costs to U.S. Households

Tariffs on $200 billion of U.S. imports from China subject to earlier 10 percent levies increased to 25 percent beginning May 10, 2019, after a breakdown in trade negotiations. In this post, we consider the cost of these higher tariffs to the typical U.S. household.

Continue reading "New China Tariffs Increase Costs to U.S. Households" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Household Finance, International Economics, Tariffs | Permalink | Comments (9)

February 13, 2019

Could Rising Household Debt Undercut China’s Economy?



LSE_Could Rising Household Debt Undercut China’s Economy?

Although there has been a notable deceleration in the pace of credit growth recently, the run-up in debt in China has been eye-popping, accounting for more than 60 percent of all new credit created globally over the past ten years. Rising nonfinancial sector debt was driven initially by an increase in corporate borrowing, which surged in 2009 in response to the global financial crisis. The most recent leg of China’s credit boom has been due to an important shift toward household lending. To better understand the rise in household debt in China and its implications for financial stability and China’s economic performance, it is important to examine the expansion in household credit, how the rise in debt compares to international experience, and the associated risks.

Continue reading "Could Rising Household Debt Undercut China’s Economy?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:13 AM in Credit, International Economics | Permalink | Comments (2)

February 11, 2019

The U.S. Dollar’s Global Roles: Where Do Things Stand?



LSE_The U.S. Dollar’s Global Roles: Where Do Things Stand?

Previous
Liberty Street Economics analysis and New York Fed research addressed the potential implications for the United States if the dollar’s global role changed, noting that the currency might not retain its dominance forever. This post checks the status of the dollar, considering whether any erosion in the dollar’s international standing has occurred. The evidence to date is that the dollar remains the world’s dominant currency by broad margins. Alternatives have not gained extensive traction, albeit this does not rule out potential future pressures.

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Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Central Bank, International Economics | Permalink | Comments (0)

January 11, 2019

Highlights from the Fourth Bi-annual Global Research Forum on International Macroeconomics and Finance



LSE_Highlights from the Fourth Bi-annual Global Research Forum on International Macroeconomics and Finance

Achieving and maintaining global financial stability has been at the forefront of policy discussions in the decade after the eruption of the global financial crisis. With the purpose of exploring key issues in international finance and macroeconomics from the perspective of what has changed ten years after the crisis, the fourth bi-annual Global Research Forum on International Macroeconomics and Finance, organized by the European Central Bank (ECB), the Federal Reserve Board, and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, was held at the ECB in Frankfurt am Main on November 29-30, 2018. Participants included a diverse group from academia, international policy institutions, national central banks, and financial markets. Among the topics of discussion: the international roles of the U.S. dollar, the evolution of global financial markets, and the safety of the global financial system.

Continue reading "Highlights from the Fourth Bi-annual Global Research Forum on International Macroeconomics and Finance" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Financial Markets, International Economics | Permalink | Comments (0)

January 09, 2019

The Perplexing Co-Movement of the Dollar and Oil Prices



LSE_The Perplexing Co-Movement of the Dollar and Oil Prices


Oil prices and the exchange rate of the U.S. dollar against the euro have often moved together over the past decade or so, but it is not at all clear why they should. The standard interpretation of oil price movements as a response to global oil supply and demand shifts makes it unlikely that the correlation stems from the dollar’s effect on oil prices. In addition, the notorious difficulty in predicting currency moves makes it hard to believe that oil prices dictate the dollar’s value. Improbability aside, however, in this blog post we document the tendency for the value of the dollar to rise relative to European currencies when oil prices fall, and we consider a possible explanation for the correlation.

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Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Exchange Rates, International Economics | Permalink | Comments (6)

January 04, 2019

The Impact of Import Tariffs on U.S. Domestic Prices



LSE_The Impact of Import Tariffs on U.S. Domestic Prices

The United States imposed new import tariffs on about $283 billion of U.S. imports in 2018, with rates ranging between 10 percent and 50 percent. In this post, we estimate the effect of these tariffs on the prices paid by U.S. producers and consumers. We find that the higher import tariffs had immediate impacts on U.S. domestic prices. Our results suggest that the aggregate consumer price index (CPI) is 0.3 percent higher than it would have been without the tariffs.

Continue reading "The Impact of Import Tariffs on U.S. Domestic Prices" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Household Finance, International Economics, Tariffs | Permalink | Comments (5)

October 22, 2018

Tax Reform and U.S. Effective Profit Taxes: From Low to Lower



LSE_Tax Reform and U.S. Effective Profit Taxes: From Low to Lower


The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) reduced the federal corporate profit tax rate from 35 percent to 21 percent. Adding in state profit taxes, the overall U.S. tax rate went from 39 percent, one of the highest rates in the world, to 26 percent, about the average rate abroad. The implications of the new law for U.S. competitiveness depend on how these statutory tax rates compare with the actual rates faced by U.S. and foreign companies. To address this question, this post presents new evidence on tax payments as a share of profits, as well as analytical measures of tax impacts on profitability. We find that the U.S. effective tax rate was already below the average rate abroad prior to enactment of the TCJA, and that it is now well below the rate in most countries.

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Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Corporate Finance, International Economics | Permalink | Comments (0)

August 13, 2018

Do Import Tariffs Help Reduce Trade Deficits?



LSE_2018_deficit_amiti_460_art

Import tariffs are on the rise in the United States, with a long list of new tariffs imposed in the last few months—25 percent on steel imports, 10 percent on aluminum, and 25 percent on $50 billion of goods from China—and possibly more to come. One of the objectives of these new tariffs is to reduce the U.S. trade deficit, which stood at $568.4 billion in 2017 (2.9 percent of GDP). The fact that the United  States imports far more than it exports is viewed by some as unfair, so the idea is to try to reduce the amount that the nation imports from the rest of the world. While more costly imports are likely to reduce the quantity and value of imports into the United States, the story does not stop there, because we cannot presume that the value of exports will remain unchanged. In this post, we argue that U.S. exports will also fall, not only because of other countries’ retaliatory tariffs on U.S. exports, but also because the costs for U.S. firms producing goods for export will rise and make U.S. exports less competitive on the world market. The end result is likely to be lower imports and lower exports, with little or no improvement in the trade deficit.

Continue reading "Do Import Tariffs Help Reduce Trade Deficits?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Exports, International Economics, Tariffs | Permalink | Comments (6)
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Liberty Street Economics features insight and analysis from New York Fed economists working at the intersection of research and policy. Launched in 2011, the blog takes its name from the Bank’s headquarters at 33 Liberty Street in Manhattan’s Financial District.

The editors are Michael Fleming, Andrew Haughwout, Thomas Klitgaard, and Asani Sarkar, all economists in the Bank’s Research Group.

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