Liberty Street Economics
August 28, 2013

U.S. Leveraged Buyouts: The Importance of Financial Visibility

In global finance, leveraged buyouts (LBOs) are an important tool for restructuring corporations.

Posted at 7:00 am in Corporate Finance | Permalink | Comments (0)
August 26, 2013

Information on Dealer Activity in Specific Treasury Issues Now Available

The New York Fed has long collected market information from its primary dealer trading counterparts and released these data in aggregated form to the public.

August 23, 2013

Historical Echoes: It Wasn’t Brain Surgery – It Was the First Economic Table

François Quesnay, an eighteenth-century brain surgeon and physician to France’s King Louis XV, was also the first to put economic data into a table.

Posted at 7:00 am in Historical Echoes | Permalink | Comments (0)
August 21, 2013

Creating a History of U.S. Inflation Expectations

Central bankers closely monitor inflation expectations because they’re an important determinant of actual inflation.

August 19, 2013

Are Higher Haircuts Better? A Paradox

Brian Begalle, Adam Copeland, Antoine Martin, Jamie McAndrews, and Susan McLaughlin Repurchase agreement (repo) markets played an important role in the 2007-09 financial crisis in the United States, and much discussion since then has focused on the role of repo haircuts. A repo is essentially a loan collateralized by securities. Typically, the value of the […]

August 16, 2013

Transparency and Sources of Information on the Federal Reserve’s Operations, Income, and Balance Sheet

This week-long series examined the evolution of the Federal Reserve’s securities portfolio and its performance over time.

Posted at 7:00 am in Exports, Fiscal Policy | Permalink | Comments (0)
August 15, 2013
August 14, 2013

Just Released: Who Is Driving the Auto Lending Recovery?

This morning, the New York Fed released its Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit for the second quarter of 2013.

Posted at 11:00 am in Household Finance | Permalink | Comments (0)
August 13, 2013
About the Blog

Liberty Street Economics features insight and analysis from New York Fed economists working at the intersection of research and policy. Launched in 2011, the blog takes its name from the Bank’s headquarters at 33 Liberty Street in Manhattan’s Financial District.

The editors are Michael Fleming, Andrew Haughwout, Thomas Klitgaard, and Asani Sarkar, all economists in the Bank’s Research Group.

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