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21 posts on "Dealers"

October 15, 2019

From the Vault: A Look Back at the October 15, 2014, Flash Rally



From the Vault: A Look Back at the October 15, 2014, Flash Rally

Five years ago today, U.S. Treasury yields plunged and then quickly rebounded for no apparent reason amid high volatility, strained liquidity conditions, and record trading volume in the market. Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell, then a Board governor, noted that such episodes, “threaten to erode investor confidence” and that investors need “to have full faith in the structure and functioning of Treasury markets themselves.” The October 15, 2014, “flash rally” led to an interagency staff report on the events of that day, an annual series of Treasury market conferences, additional study of clearing and settlement practices, and the introduction of a new transactions reporting scheme. Many of these developments are discussed in posts (see, for example, here and here) in the Liberty Street Economics archive.

Continue reading "From the Vault: A Look Back at the October 15, 2014, Flash Rally" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Dealers, Financial Markets, Treasury | Permalink | Comments (0)

June 26, 2019

How Large Are Default Spillovers in the U.S. Financial System?



Second of two posts
How Large Are Default Spillovers in the U.S. Financial System?

When a financial firm suffers sufficiently high losses, it might default on its counterparties, who may in turn become unable to pay their own creditors, and so on. This “domino” or “cascade” effect can quickly propagate through the financial system, creating undesirable spillovers and unnecessary defaults. In this post, we use the framework that we discussed in “Assessing Contagion Risk in a Financial Network,” the first part of this two-part series, to answer the question: How vulnerable is the U.S. financial system to default spillovers?

Continue reading "How Large Are Default Spillovers in the U.S. Financial System?" »

April 03, 2019

Are New Repo Participants Gaining Ground?



LSE_Are New Repo Participants Gaining Ground?

Following the 2007-09 financial crisis, regulations were introduced that increased the cost of entering into repurchase agreements (repo) for bank holding companies (BHC). As a consequence, banks and securities dealers associated with BHCs, a set of firms which dominates the repo market, were predicted to pull back from the market. In this blog post, we examine whether this changed environment allowed new participants, particularly those not subject to the new regulations, to emerge. We find that although new participants have come on the scene and made gains, they remain a small part of the overall repo market.

Continue reading "Are New Repo Participants Gaining Ground?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Dealers, Financial Markets, Repo | Permalink | Comments (1)

January 16, 2019

Customer and Employee Losses in Lehman’s Bankruptcy



Fourth of five posts
LSE_2019_lehman4-clients_sarkar_460

In our second post on the Lehman bankruptcy, we discussed the cost to Lehman’s creditors from having their funds tied up in bankruptcy proceedings. In this post, we focus on losses to Lehman’s customers and employees from the destruction of firm-specific assets that could not be deployed as productively with other firms. Our conclusions are based in part on what happened after bankruptcy—whether, for example, customer accounts moved to other firms or employees found jobs elsewhere. While these costs are difficult to pin down, the analysis suggests that the most notable losses were borne by mutual funds that relied on Lehman’s specialized brokerage advice and firms that employed Lehman for its equity underwriting services.

Continue reading "Customer and Employee Losses in Lehman’s Bankruptcy" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Banks, Crisis, Dealers, Employment, Financial Intermediation | Permalink | Comments (0)

January 15, 2019

Lehman’s Bankruptcy Expenses



Third of five posts
LSE_Lehman’s Bankruptcy Expenses

In bankruptcy, firms incur expenses for services provided by lawyers, accountants, and other professionals. Such expenses can be quite high, especially for complex resolutions. These direct costs of bankruptcy proceedings reduce a firm’s value below its fundamental level, thus constituting a “deadweight loss.” Bankruptcy also carries indirect costs, such as the loss in value of assets trapped in bankruptcy—a subject discussed in our previous post. In this post, we provide the first comprehensive estimates of the direct costs of resolving Lehman Brothers’ holding company (LBHI) and its affiliates under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code, and of Lehman’s broker-dealer (LBI) under the Securities Investor Protection Act (SIPA).

Continue reading "Lehman’s Bankruptcy Expenses" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Crisis, Dealers, Financial Intermediation | Permalink | Comments (0)

January 14, 2019

How Much Value Was Destroyed by the Lehman Bankruptcy?



First of five posts
LSE_How Much Value Was Destroyed by the Lehman Bankruptcy?

Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. (LBHI) filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on September 15, 2008, initiating one of the largest and most complex bankruptcy proceedings in history. Recovery prospects for creditors, who submitted about $1.2 trillion of claims against the Lehman estate, were quite bleak. This week, we will publish a series of four posts that provide an assessment of the value lost to Lehman, its creditors, and other stakeholders now that the bankruptcy proceedings are winding down. Where appropriate, we also consider the liquidation of Lehman’s investment banking affiliate, which occurred in separate proceedings under the Securities Investor Protection Act (SIPA).

Continue reading "How Much Value Was Destroyed by the Lehman Bankruptcy?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Banks, Crisis, Dealers, Financial Intermediation | Permalink | Comments (2)

September 12, 2018

Do You Know How Your Treasury Trades Are Cleared and Settled?



LSE_2018_Do You Know How Your Treasury Trades Are Cleared and Settled?t

The Treasury Market Practices Group (TMPG) recently released a consultative white paper on clearing and settlement processes for secondary market trades of U.S. Treasury securities. The paper describes in detail the many ways Treasury trades are cleared and settled— information that may not be readily available to all market participants—and identifies potential risk and resiliency issues. The work is designed to facilitate discussion as to whether current practices have room for improvement. In this post, we summarize the current state of clearing and settlement for secondary market Treasury trades and highlight some of the risks described in the white paper.

Continue reading "Do You Know How Your Treasury Trades Are Cleared and Settled?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Dealers, Financial Institutions, Financial Markets, Treasury | Permalink | Comments (0)

October 04, 2017

The Cost and Duration of Excess Funding Capacity in Tri-Party Repo



Editor's note: In the original version of this blog post, a computational error was reflected in the chart “Distribution of Premiums Paid on ‘Excess Capacity’ Repos” and related text. Both have been corrected. (October 23, 2017, 12:37 p.m.)

LSE_2017_The Cost and Duration of Excess Funding Capacity in Tri-Party Repo

In a previous post, we showed that dealers sometimes enter into tri-party repo contracts to acquire excess funding capacity, and that this strategy is most prevalent for the agency mortgage-backed securities (MBS) and equity asset classes. In this post, we examine the maturity of the repos used to pursue this strategy and estimate the associated costs. We find that repos that generate excess funding capacity for equities and corporate debt have longer maturities than the average repo involving either of these asset classes. Furthermore, the premiums dealers pay to maintain excess funding capacity can be substantial, particularly for equities.

Continue reading "The Cost and Duration of Excess Funding Capacity in Tri-Party Repo" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Dealers, Financial Intermediation, Repo | Permalink | Comments (2)

October 02, 2017

Excess Funding Capacity in Tri-Party Repo



LSE_2017_Excess Funding Capacity in Tri-Party Repo

Security dealers sometimes enter into tri-party repo contracts to fund one class of securities with the expectation they will wind up settling the contract with higher quality securities. This strategy is costly to dealers because they could have borrowed funds at lower rates had they agreed to use the higher-quality securities at the outset. So why do dealers do this? Why obtain or arrange excess funding for the initial asset class? In this post, we discuss possible rationales for an excess funding strategy and measure the extent of excess funding capacity in the tri-party repo market. In a second post, we examine the maturities of repos used to generate excess funding capacity and estimate the costs of this strategy.

Continue reading "Excess Funding Capacity in Tri-Party Repo" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Dealers, Financial Intermediation, Repo | Permalink | Comments (0)

May 24, 2017

Dealer Balance Sheets and Corporate Bond Liquidity Provision



Dealer Balance Sheets and Corporate Bond Liquidity Provision

Regulatory reforms since the financial crisis have sought to make the financial system safer and severe financial crises less likely. But by limiting the ability of regulated institutions to increase their balance sheet size, reforms—such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the United States and the Basel Committee's Basel III bank regulations internationally—might reduce the total intermediation capacity of the financial system during normal times. Decreases in intermediation capacity may then lead to decreased liquidity in markets in which the regulated institutions intermediate significant trading activity. While recent commentary by market participants claims that this is indeed the case—Wall Street Journal article [subscription required] notes that “three-quarters of institutional bond investors say that liquidity provided by bond dealers has declined in the past year...”—empirical studies have struggled to find evidence supporting this narrative. In this post, we summarize the findings of our recent article in the Journal of Monetary Economics that addresses the apparent disconnect between the market-participant commentary and the empirical evidence by focusing on the relationship between bond-level liquidity and financial institutions’ balance sheet constraints.

Continue reading "Dealer Balance Sheets and Corporate Bond Liquidity Provision" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Dealers, Financial Institutions, Financial Markets | Permalink | Comments (0)
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Liberty Street Economics features insight and analysis from New York Fed economists working at the intersection of research and policy. Launched in 2011, the blog takes its name from the Bank’s headquarters at 33 Liberty Street in Manhattan’s Financial District.

The editors are Michael Fleming, Andrew Haughwout, Thomas Klitgaard, and Asani Sarkar, all economists in the Bank’s Research Group.

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