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14 posts on "Household"

September 30, 2016

From the Vault: Does Forward Guidance Work?



In recent months, there have been some high-profile assessments of how far the Federal Reserve has come in terms of communicating about monetary policy since its “secrets of the temple” days. While observers say the transition to greater transparency “still seems to be a work in progress,” they note the range of steps the Fed has taken over the years to shed light on its strategy, including issuing statements to announce and explain policy changes following Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meetings, post-meeting press conferences and minutes, FOMC-member speeches and testimony, and “forward guidance” in all its variants.

Continue reading "From the Vault: Does Forward Guidance Work?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in DSGE, Expectations, Fed Funds, Forecasting, Household, Inflation, Treasury | Permalink | Comments (2)

June 27, 2016

Hey, Economist! How Is the Research and Statistics Group Changing?



LSE_Hey, Economist! How Is the Research and Statistics Group Changing?

As Director of Research for the New York Fed for the past seven years, Jamie McAndrews has been responsible for the Bank’s financial and economic policy research, as well as the collection of data and statistics from financial institutions. On the eve of his retirement on June 30, Jamie shared his perspective on how the Research and Statistics Group has changed with Andrew Haughwout, a senior vice president in the Group.

Continue reading "Hey, Economist! How Is the Research and Statistics Group Changing?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in DSGE, Hey, Economist!, Household, Macroecon, Monetary Policy | Permalink | Comments (1)

May 25, 2016

The Macro Effects of the Recent Swing in Financial Conditions



Credit conditions tightened considerably in the second half of 2015 and U.S. growth slowed. We estimate the extent to which tighter credit conditions last year were responsible for the slowdown using the FRBNY DSGE model. We find that growth would have slowed substantially more had the Federal Reserve not delayed liftoff in the federal funds rate.

Continue reading "The Macro Effects of the Recent Swing in Financial Conditions" »

May 20, 2015

Why Are Interest Rates So Low?



Second post in the series
In a recent series of blog posts, the former Chairman of the Federal Reserve System, Ben Bernanke, has asked the question: “Why are interest rates so low?” (See part 1, part 2, and part 3.) He refers, of course, to the fact that the U.S. government is able to borrow at an annualized rate of around 2 percent for ten years, or around 3 percent for thirty years. If you expect that inflation is going to be on average 2 percent over the next ten or thirty years, this implies that the U.S. government can borrow at real rates of interest between 0 and 1 percent at the ten- and thirty-year maturities. This phenomenon is by no means limited to the United States. Governments in Japan and Germany are able to borrow for ten years at nominal rates below 1 percent, and the ten-year yield on Swiss government debt is slightly negative. Why is that?

Continue reading "Why Are Interest Rates So Low?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in DSGE, Financial Markets, Household, Macroecon, Monetary Policy, Wages | Permalink | Comments (7)
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Liberty Street Economics features insight and analysis from New York Fed economists working at the intersection of research and policy. Launched in 2011, the blog takes its name from the Bank’s headquarters at 33 Liberty Street in Manhattan’s Financial District.

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