Liberty Street Economics
September 18, 2014

At the N.Y. Fed: Workshop on the Risks of Wholesale Funding

The Federal Reserve Banks of Boston and New York recently cosponsored a workshop on the risks of wholesale funding.

September 8, 2014

Why Aren’t More Renters Becoming Homeowners?

Recent activity in the U.S. housing market has been widely perceived as disappointing.

Posted at 2:00 pm in Credit, Inflation | Permalink | Comments (6)

Introducing the SCE Housing Survey

In February 2014, we administered a survey on housing-related issues to the Survey of Consumer Expectations (SCE) panelists.

Posted at 12:00 pm in Inflation | Permalink | Comments (0)
September 5, 2014

Crisis Chronicles: The British Export Bubble of 1810 and Pegged versus Floating Exchange Rates

In the early 1800s, Napoleon’s plan to defeat Britain was to destroy its ability to trade.

September 4, 2014

Are the Job Prospects of Recent College Graduates Improving?

The promise of finding a good job upon graduation has always been an important consideration when weighing the value of a college degree.

College May Not Pay Off for Everyone

In our recent Current Issues article and blog posts on the value of a college degree, we showed that the economic benefits of a bachelor’s degree still far outweigh the costs.

September 3, 2014

Staying in College Longer Than Four Years Costs More Than You Might Think

In yesterday’s blog post and in our recent article in the New York Fed’s Current Issues series, we showed that the economic benefits of a bachelor’s degree still outweigh the costs, on average, even in today’s difficult labor market.

Posted at 12:00 pm in Labor Economics, Wages | Permalink | Comments (2)

Just Released: N.Y. Fed’s Emanuel Moench to Become Head of Research at the Deutsche Bundesbank

No one can accuse the Federal Reserve Bank of New York of not being a big supporter of central bank cooperation.

Posted at 9:00 am in Euro Area, Labor Economics | Permalink | Comments (0)
September 2, 2014

From Our Archive: Reading Labor Market Slack

In her speech “Labor Market Dynamics and Monetary Policy” at the Kansas City Fed’s recent Jackson Hole symposium, Fed chairwoman Janet Yellen discussed economic puzzles challenging policymakers, including topics we’ve addressed on Liberty Street Economics.

The Value of a College Degree

Not so long ago, people rarely questioned the value of a college degree. A bachelor’s degree was seen as a surefire ticket to a career-oriented, good-paying job.

Posted at 7:00 am in Education, Labor Economics | Permalink | Comments (9)
About the Blog

Liberty Street Economics features insight and analysis from New York Fed economists working at the intersection of research and policy. Launched in 2011, the blog takes its name from the Bank’s headquarters at 33 Liberty Street in Manhattan’s Financial District.

The editors are Michael Fleming, Andrew Haughwout, Thomas Klitgaard, and Asani Sarkar, all economists in the Bank’s Research Group.

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