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30 posts on "household finance"
February 22, 2016

Whither Mortgages?

Our most recent Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit showed that although total household debt has increased somewhat since 2012, that growth has been driven almost entirely by nonhousing debt—credit cards, auto loans and student loans.

Posted at 7:00 am in Household Finance, Housing | Permalink | Comments (2)
August 24, 2015

Rethinking Mortgage Design

John Campbell, Andreas Fuster, David O. Lucca, Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh, and James Vickery Because mortgages make up the majority of household debt in most developed countries, mortgage design has important implications for macroeconomic policy and household welfare. As one example, most U.S. mortgages have fixed interest rates—if interest rates fall, existing borrowers need to refinance […]

Posted at 7:00 am in Household Finance, Housing | Permalink | Comments (1)
July 13, 2015

The Survey of Consumer Expectations Turns Two!

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s Survey of Consumer Expectations (SCE) turned two years old in June.

Posted at 11:00 am in Expectations, Labor Market | Permalink
April 16, 2015

Just Released: Press Briefing on Student Loan Borrowing and Repayment Trends, 2015

This morning, Jamie McAndrews, the Director of Research at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, spoke to the press about the economic recovery, and his speech was followed by a special briefing by New York Fed economists on student loans. Here, we provide a short summary of the student loan briefing.

June 26, 2014

From Our Archive: Student Debt in Perspective

The Editors We read with interest a new Brookings Institution report, Is a Student Loan Crisis on the Horizon?, assessing the weight of the student debt burden. It was also pleasing to see the New York Times, several of our Twitter followers, and others citing work on this blog in counterpoint.

December 6, 2013

Introducing the FRBNY Survey of Consumer Expectations: Household Finance Expectations

In this fourth and final post in our series describing the new FRBNY Survey of Consumer Expectations (SCE), we present the final component of the survey, dedicated to household finance.

December 5, 2013

Introducing the FRBNY Survey of Consumer Expectations: Labor Market Expectations

In the previous two blog postings in this series, we described the goals, structure, and content of the new FRBNY Survey of Consumer Expectations (SCE) and presented some findings regarding inflation expectations.

December 4, 2013

Introducing the FRBNY Survey of Consumer Expectations: Measuring Price Inflation Expectations

In this second of a series of four blog postings, we discuss the data on inflation expectations collected in our new FRBNY Survey of Consumer Expectations (SCE).

Posted at 7:05 am in Expectations, Inflation | Permalink
November 14, 2013

Just Released: Deleveraging Decelerates and Household Balances Increase

Today, the New York Fed released the 2013:Q3 Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit.

Posted at 11:15 am in Household Finance | Permalink
August 29, 2012

Just Released: Has Household Deleveraging Continued?

Today’s release of the 2012Q2 Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit indicates a continuation of the downward trend in household debt, which followed a long period of substantial increases.

Posted at 11:00 am in Credit, Household Finance | Permalink | Comments (1)
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