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92 posts on "Regional Analysis"

October 13, 2017

Upstate New York’s Expansion Is Losing Steam



LSE_2017_Upstate New York’s Expansion Is Losing Steam

All in all, the upstate New York economy fared pretty well during the last business cycle. Job losses were less severe in upstate New York during the Great Recession than they were for the nation as a whole, which was quite unusual. And once the jobs recovery began in 2010, employment in upstate New York started to grow again, though at a pace well below the nation’s. The result of this slow but steady recovery was that by mid-2015, upstate New York had gained back all of the jobs that were lost during the Great Recession—a milestone the region had failed to reach at all during the prior few business cycles. Troublingly, though, job growth in the region stalled shortly after crossing this milestone. Indeed, only a handful of jobs have been added to the area’s total employment count since early 2016. In this blog post, we explore the nature and magnitude of this slowdown in upstate New York.

Continue reading "Upstate New York’s Expansion Is Losing Steam" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Regional Analysis | Permalink | Comments (0)

October 05, 2017

How Is Online Shopping Affecting Retail Employment?



LSE_How Is Online Shopping Affecting Retail Employment?

It’s been said that if you want to know how the economy is doing, look at how many people are carrying shopping bags. That adage may not hold so well today. The rise of the internet and e-commerce over the past two decades has chipped away at the market share of “brick and mortar” retailers. But it’s only been in the past few years that this shift in market share has had a noteworthy effect on retail employment. In this post, we focus on national and local employment trends in two categories of retail—department stores and nonstore retailers—and try to assess how the surge in online shopping has affected local labor markets across the United States.

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Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Labor Economics, Regional Analysis | Permalink | Comments (2)

August 10, 2017

Just Released: Economic Press Briefing Focuses on Regional Wage Inequality



LSE_Just Released: Economic Press Briefing Focuses on Regional Wage Inequality

The New York-Northern New Jersey region is home to some of the most and least unequal places in the nation, based on research presented today at our economic press briefing examining wage inequality in the region. Wage inequality—meaning the disparity in earnings between workers—has increased significantly in the United States since the early 1980s, though some places have much more wage inequality than others. Fairfield, Conn., for example, ranks as the most unequal metropolitan area in the country, and the New York–Northern New Jersey metropolitan area ranks in the top ten. On the other hand, most of the metropolitan areas in upstate New York are among the least unequal places in the country.

Continue reading "Just Released: Economic Press Briefing Focuses on Regional Wage Inequality" »

Posted by Blog Author at 10:00 AM in Labor Market, Regional Analysis | Permalink | Comments (0)

June 16, 2017

Just Released: June Regional Business Surveys Paint a Mixed Picture



LSE_Just Released: June Regional Business Surveys Paint a Mixed Picture

Yesterday’s June Empire State Manufacturing Survey pointed to a significant increase in regional manufacturing activity. However, our parallel survey for the region’s service sector, the June Business Leaders Survey, released today, paints a somewhat dreary picture of regional service-sector activity. These two surveys, taken together, suggest that economic conditions in the New York-Northern New Jersey region are mixed.

Continue reading "Just Released: June Regional Business Surveys Paint a Mixed Picture" »

Posted by Blog Author at 8:45 AM in New Jersey, New York, Regional Analysis | Permalink | Comments (0)

March 01, 2017

Just Released: The Regional Economy Is off to a Good Start in 2017



LSE_2017_Just Released: The Regional Economy Is off to a Good Start in 2017

The New York Fed’s latest Beige Book report, released this afternoon, shows the regional economy gathering steam in early 2017. The report, based on information collected through February 17, suggests the regional economy, which had been essentially flat for the second half of 2016, saw growth pick up to a modest pace at the start of the year. Manufacturers, in particular, note a sharp rise in activity, as do businesses in wholesale distribution and transportation. Consequently, the market for industrial and warehouse space was pretty robust in the opening weeks of 2017. Meanwhile, businesses in most service industries continue to report steady to moderately expanding activity. And even though consumer spending has remained fairly subdued, consumer confidence climbed to highs not seen in more than a decade. All in all, it appears the regional economy has gotten off to a good start in 2017.

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Posted by Blog Author at 2:15 PM in Regional Analysis | Permalink | Comments (0)

December 16, 2016

Just Released: Regional Business Surveys Point to Growth in Economic Activity



LSE_BLS_2016_survey_460_art

The latest editions of the New York Fed’s two regional business surveys point to improvement in business conditions and widespread optimism about the near-term outlook. The December Business Leaders Survey of regional service firms, released today, shows service sector activity steadying after declining for a number of months, and the December Empire State Manufacturing Survey, released yesterday, indicates that manufacturing activity increased for the first time since the summer.

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Posted by Blog Author at 8:45 AM in Macroecon, Regional Analysis | Permalink | Comments (0)

November 18, 2016

Just Released: Press Briefing on the Survey of Consumer Expectations



LSE_Just Released: Press Briefing on the Survey of Consumer Expectations

The New York Fed’s Survey of Consumer Expectations (SCE) collects information on household heads’ economic expectations and behavior. In particular, the survey covers respondents’ views on how inflation, spending, credit access, and the housing and labor markets will evolve over time. The SCE yields important insights that inform our monetary policy decisions. This morning, President Dudley joined New York Fed economists to brief the press on the design of the SCE and the latest releases of survey results. President Dudley introduced the briefing by speaking about the benefits of measuring consumers’ expectations.

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October 19, 2016

Lower Manhattan since 9/11: A Study in Resilience

Jason Bram and Joelle Scally

LSE_Lower Manhattan since 9/11: A Study in Resilience

The 9/11 terrorist attack on the World Trade Center left a deep scar on New York City and the nation, most particularly in terms of the human toll. In addition to the lives lost and widespread health problems suffered by many others—in particular by first responders and recovery workers—the destruction of billions of dollars’ worth of property and infrastructure led to severe disruptions to the local economy. Nowhere were these disruptions more severe and long-lasting than in the neighborhoods closest to Ground Zero.

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Posted by Blog Author at 10:00 AM in Employment, Expectations, New York City, Regional Analysis | Permalink | Comments (0)

October 17, 2016

What Caused the Decline in Interstate Migration in the United States?



LSE_What Caused the Decline in Interstate Migration in the United States?

Geographic mobility is thought to be important both for economic mobility and for the efficiency of a labor market in allocating the right people to the right jobs. Accordingly, the willingness of the U.S. workforce to move is a factor behind the greater dynamism of the U.S. labor market compared to Europe. While Europeans tend to be more reluctant to move to distant places within their respective countries, the idea of moving across state borders for a job has been woven into the fabric of the American Dream. However, the image of the United States as a mobile nation has changed substantially over recent decades. This post investigates the role that demographic shifts—in particular, the nation’s aging population—have played in the recent decline in interstate migration.

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Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Labor Economics, Regional Analysis, Unemployment | Permalink | Comments (4)

August 18, 2016

Just Released: Job Growth in the Region



LSE_Just Released: Job Growth in the Region


At today’s economic press briefing, we provided an update on regional economic conditions, with a particular focus on job growth in the region, and highlighted an important emerging labor market trend: the return of middle-wage jobs.

Continue reading "Just Released: Job Growth in the Region" »

Posted by Blog Author at 10:00 AM in Labor Economics, Regional Analysis | Permalink | Comments (2)
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