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27 posts on "Labor Economics"

March 10, 2014

Just Released: Beyond the Unemployment Rate: Eight Different Faces of the Labor Market

Samuel Kapon and Ayşegül Şahin

This morning, the New York Fed released a new set of charts measuring various dimensions of the labor market. These charts are mostly generated from data available through the Current Population Survey (CPS), the Current Employment Statistics (CES) program, and the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS). This new monthly release will provide timely updates to help economists and the public understand national labor market conditions. The charts are split into eight distinct categories: unemployment, employment, hours, labor demand, job availability, job loss rate, wages, and mismatch.

Continue reading "Just Released: Beyond the Unemployment Rate: Eight Different Faces of the Labor Market" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Labor Economics | Permalink | Comments (3)

February 19, 2014

Why Is the Job-Finding Rate Still Low?

Victoria Gregory, Christina Patterson, Ayşegül Şahin, and Giorgio Topa

Fluctuations in unemployment are mostly driven by fluctuations in the job-finding prospects of unemployed workers—except at the onset of recessions, according to various research papers (see, for example, Shimer [2005, 2012] and Elsby, Hobijn, and Sahin [2010]). With job losses back to their pre-recession levels, the job-finding rate is arguably one of the most important indicators to watch. This rate—defined as the fraction of unemployed workers in a given month who find jobs in the consecutive month—provides a good measure of how easy it is to find jobs in the economy. The chart below presents the job-finding rate starting from 1990. Clearly, the job-finding rate is still substantially below its pre-recession levels, suggesting that it is still difficult for the unemployed to find work. In this post, we explore the underlying reasons behind the low job-finding rate.

Continue reading "Why Is the Job-Finding Rate Still Low?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Labor Economics, Macroecon | Permalink | Comments (1)

February 14, 2014

Puerto Rico Employment Trends–Not Quite as Bleak as They Appear

Jason Bram

Puerto Rico’s economy has been in a protracted economic slump since 2006. If there were officially designated recessions for the Commonwealth, it probably would have been in one for the better part of these past seven years. Real GNP had fallen 12 percent before finally leveling off in 2012. But the economic measure most widely relied upon to gauge the island’s economy—because the data are monthly and timely—is payroll employment. Between early 2006 and the first half of 2011, this measure fell by a similar amount (13 percent); it then started to recover gradually in late 2011 and into the first part of 2012. But late in the year it began to nosedive again, reaching new lows in mid-2013—Or did it? More complete tabulations of employment presage upward revisions to Puerto Rico’s payroll job count, suggesting that current employment (and thus economic) conditions are not as gloomy as they appear, based on currently reported data.

Continue reading "Puerto Rico Employment Trends–Not Quite as Bleak as They Appear" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Labor Economics, Regional Analysis | Permalink | Comments (4)

February 05, 2014

Comparing U.S. and Euro Area Unemployment Rates

Thomas Klitgaard and Richard Peck

Euro area growth has been stalled since 2010, mired in the sovereign debt crisis, while the United States has managed a slow but steady recovery following the Great Recession. Euro area and U.S. labor markets reflect these differing growth paths. While unemployment rates in the euro area and the United States were both around 10 percent in 2010, the unemployment rate in the euro area has since increased to 12.0 percent, and the U.S. rate has fallen to 6.7 percent. However, the outperformance of the U.S. labor market as measured by unemployment rates is overstated. Employment relative to the population has declined in the euro area, but the divergence of this measure from that of the United States is more modest than suggested by unemployment rates. The difference is that, unlike in the United States, the share of women in the euro area labor force is increasing, and that development accounts for roughly half of the current gap between unemployment rates in the two economies.

Continue reading "Comparing U.S. and Euro Area Unemployment Rates" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in International Economics, Labor Economics | Permalink | Comments (0)

February 03, 2014

A Mis-Leading Labor Market Indicator

Samuel Kapon and Joseph Tracy

The unemployment rate is a popular measure of the condition of the labor market. With the Great Recession, the unemployment rate increased from a low of 4.4 percent in March 2007 to a peak of 10.0 percent in October 2009. As the economy recovered and growth resumed, the unemployment rate has fallen to 6.7 percent. What other measures are useful to supplement our understanding of the degree of the labor market recovery?

Continue reading "A Mis-Leading Labor Market Indicator" »

Posted by Blog Author at 12:00 PM in Labor Economics, Macroecon | Permalink | Comments (18)

January 06, 2014

Are Economic Values Transmitted from Parents to Children?

Marco Cipriani, Paola Giuliano, and Olivier Jeanne

Economic research shows that differences in cultural traits and values—for example, trust, or the propensity to cooperate and not free-ride on others—are important determinants of economic outcomes, such as growth, economic and financial development, and international trade. It’s much less clear, however, where these differences in economic-relevant values come from. While economists generally assume that they’re transmitted from parents to children, the empirical evidence to this effect is almost nonexistent.

Continue reading "Are Economic Values Transmitted from Parents to Children?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Labor Economics | Permalink | Comments (4)

November 20, 2013

Just Released: Lifting the Veil—For-Profits in the Higher Education Landscape

Rajashri Chakrabarti and John Grigsby

Higher education is pivotal in our society—yet, its landscape is changing. Over the past decade, the private, for-profit sector of higher education has seen unprecedented growth, and its market share is at an all-time high. While we know much about traditional four-year public and private non-profit institutions, the for-profit sector seems more opaque. What services does it provide? Who enrolls at for-profits, and how has their enrollment changed during the Great Recession? What are their tuition levels? How about their net prices and student loans? And do their students succeed? We shed some light on these important questions in today’s economic press briefing at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and in a new set of interactive maps and charts released today by the New York Fed.

Continue reading "Just Released: Lifting the Veil—For-Profits in the Higher Education Landscape" »

Posted by Blog Author at 10:00 AM in Education, Labor Economics | Permalink | Comments (2)

September 23, 2013

Waiting for Recovery: New York Schools and the Aftermath of the Great Recession

Rajashri Chakrabarti and Max Livingston

A key institution that was significantly affected by the Great Recession is the school system, which plays a crucial role in building human capital and shaping the country’s economic future. To prevent major cuts to education, the federal government allocated $100 billion to schools as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), commonly known as the stimulus package. However, the stimulus has wound down while many sectors of the economy are still struggling, leaving state and local governments with budget squeezes. In this post, we present some key findings on how school finances in New York State fared during this period, drawing on our recent study and a series of interactive graphics. As the stimulus ended, school district funding fell dramatically and districts across the state enacted significant cuts across the board, affecting not only noninstructional spending but also instructional spending—the category most closely related to student learning.

Continue reading "Waiting for Recovery: New York Schools and the Aftermath of the Great Recession" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Education, Labor Economics, Regional Analysis | Permalink | Comments (0)

September 04, 2013

Consumer Confidence: A Useful Indicator of . . . the Labor Market?

Jason Bram, Robert Rich, and Joshua Abel

Consumer confidence is closely monitored by policymakers and commentators because of the presumed insight it can offer into the outlook for consumer spending and thus the economy in general. Yet there’s another useful dimension to consumer confidence that’s often overlooked: its ability to signal incipient developments in the job market. In this post, we look at trends in a particular measure of consumer confidence—the Present Situation Index component of the Conference Board’s Consumer Confidence Index—over the past thirty-five years and show that they’re closely associated with movements in the unemployment rate and in payroll employment.

Continue reading "Consumer Confidence: A Useful Indicator of . . . the Labor Market?" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Labor Economics, Macroecon | Permalink | Comments (2)

June 26, 2013

States Are Recovering Lost Jobs at Surprisingly Similar Rates

Jason Bram and James Orr

The U.S. economy lost more than 8 million jobs between January 2008 and February 2010. In contrast with earlier recessions, employment declines were seen across almost all states. The extent varied: In this recession, states with big housing busts generally saw steeper job losses, especially in construction, while some states also had severe job losses driven by manufacturing declines. One feature of this employment recovery is that it’s actually been quite uniform across states—and much more uniform than in earlier recoveries. With few exceptions, states appear to be marching in lockstep.

Continue reading "States Are Recovering Lost Jobs at Surprisingly Similar Rates" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Labor Economics, Macroecon, Regional Analysis | Permalink | Comments (0)
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