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20 posts on "Dodd-Frank"
May 12, 2017

At the N.Y. Fed: The Evolution of OTC Derivatives Markets

The 2007-09 financial crisis illustrated the fragility of over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives markets and the contagion generated through bilateral derivatives exposures.

November 30, 2015

U.S. Banks’ Changing Footprint at Home and Abroad

Linda Goldberg and Rose Wang investigate changes in bank holding company (BHC) geography, especially the rising share of BHC affiliates in tax havens and financial secrecy jurisdictions.

July 1, 2015

What Do Bond Markets Think about “Too-Big-to-Fail” Since Dodd-Frank?

As we discussed in our post on Monday, the Dodd-Frank Act includes provisions to address whether banks remain “too big to fail.”

June 29, 2015

What Do Rating Agencies Think about “Too-Big-to-Fail” Since Dodd-Frank?

Did the Dodd-Frank Act end ‘‘too-big-to-fail’’(TBTF)?

March 30, 2015

The Effects of Entering and Exiting a Credit Default Swap Index

Since their inception in 2002, credit default swap (CDS) indexes have gained tremendous popularity and become leading barometers of the credit market.

May 29, 2013

Piggy Banks

What do banks do?

January 4, 2013

Historical Echoes: The Origins of the Piggy Bank

Looking far back, all the way to the Middle Ages, people were in many ways very similar to those living today.

April 30, 2012

The Impact of Trade Reporting on the Interest Rate Derivatives Market

In recent years, regulators in the United States and abroad have begun to strengthen regulations governing over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives trading, driven by concerns over the decentralized and opaque nature of current trading practices.

February 15, 2012

The Dodd-Frank Act’s Potential Effects on the Credit Rating Industry

Credit rating agencies have been widely criticized in recent years for the poor performance of their ratings on mortgage-backed securities (MBS) and other structured-finance bonds.

November 23, 2011

How Might Increased Transparency Affect the CDS Market?

The credit default swap (CDS) market has grown rapidly since the asset class was developed in the 1990s.

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