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21 posts on "Puerto Rico"
August 9, 2016

Migration in Puerto Rico: Is There a Brain Drain?

Given Puerto Rico’s long-term economic malaise and ongoing fiscal crisis, it is no wonder that out-migration of the Island’s residents has picked up.

August 8, 2016

Restoring Economic Growth in Puerto Rico: Introduction to the Series

The difficult economic and financial issues facing the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico have remained very much in the news since our post on options for addressing its fiscal problems appeared last fall. That post was itself a follow-up on a series of analyses, starting with a 2012 report that detailed the economic challenges facing the Commonwealth. In 2014, we extended that analysis with an update where we focused more closely on the fiscal challenges facing the Island. As the problems deepened, we have continued to examine important related subjects ranging from positive revisions in employment data, to the understanding emigration, and to considering how the Commonwealth’s public debts stack up. In most of this work, we have focused on how policymakers could help to address the immediate issues facing the Island and its people. The U.S. Congress and the Obama Administration took action in June to provide a framework to help address Puerto Rico’s fiscal crisis. But much remains to be done to address these ongoing problems, which represent a significant impediment to economic growth in the short run. It also seems important to revisit the question of the prospects for reviving longer-run growth in the Commonwealth. These concerns were underscored by projections published by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in the April edition of the World Economic Outlook that forecast Puerto Rico’s real GDP and population to decline through 2021.

November 3, 2015

Some Options for Addressing Puerto Rico’s Fiscal Problems

By Hunter L. Clark, Andrew F. Haughwout, and James A. Orr Puerto Rico’s economic and fiscal challenges have been an important focus of work done here at the New York Fed, resulting in two reports (2012 and 2014), several blog posts and one paper in our Current Issues series in just the last few years. […]

August 26, 2015

Just Released: An Update on Regional Economic Conditions Provided at Our Economic Press Briefing

Jaison R. Abel, Jason Bram, Richard Deitz, and James Orr Today’s Economic Press Briefing at the New York Fed presented our economic outlook for New York, Northern New Jersey, and Puerto Rico. We showed that many parts of the region have bounced back quite well from the Great Recession and are growing at a solid […]

April 13, 2015

Population Lost: Puerto Rico’s Troubling Out-Migration

Jaison R. Abel and Richard Deitz For the first time in modern history, Puerto Rico is seeing its population decline. This troubling loss can be traced to an exodus of Puerto Rican citizens to the U.S. mainland, a current that has picked up considerably in recent years as Puerto Rico’s economy has deteriorated. Today, fully […]

March 20, 2015

Just Released: Benchmark Revisions Paint a Brighter Picture of (Most of) the Regional Economy

Every March, the Bureau of Labor Statistics releases benchmark revisions of state and local payroll employment for the past year.

July 31, 2014

Just Released: Updated Study of the Competitiveness of Puerto Rico’s Economy Proposes Steps to Address the Island’s Fiscal Stress

An Update on the Competitiveness of Puerto Rico’s Economy, released today, offers six steps that the Island’s government should consider taking to restore its fiscal health.

May 21, 2014

Just Released: What Kinds of Jobs Have Been Created during the Recovery?

At today’s regional economic press briefing, we provided an update on economic conditions in New York, northern New Jersey, and Puerto Rico, with a special focus on the kinds of jobs that have been created in each of these places during the recovery.

February 14, 2014

Puerto Rico Employment Trends–Not Quite as Bleak as They Appear

Puerto Rico’s economy has been in a protracted economic slump since 2006. If there were officially designated recessions for the Commonwealth, it probably would have been in one for the better part of these past seven years.

November 15, 2013

A Long Road to Economic Recovery for the U.S. Virgin Islands

The U.S. Virgin Islands are a small and unique component of the Second Federal Reserve District.

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