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61 posts on "Monetary Policy"

December 08, 2014

Global Asset Prices and the Taper Tantrum Revisited



Global asset market developments during the summer of 2013 have been attributed to changes in the outlook for U.S. monetary policy, starting with former Chairman Bernanke’s May 22 comments concerning future curtailing of the Federal Reserve’s asset purchase programs. A previous post found that the signal of a possible change in U.S. monetary policy coincided with an increase in global risk aversion which put downward pressure on global asset prices. This post revisits this episode by measuring the impact of changes in Fed’s expected policy rate path and in the economic outlook on the U.S. dollar and emerging market equity prices. The analysis suggests that changes in the U.S. and foreign outlooks had a meaningful role in explaining global asset price movements during the so-called taper tantrum.

Continue reading "Global Asset Prices and the Taper Tantrum Revisited" »

December 05, 2014

Survey Measures of Expectations for the Policy Rate




Liberty Street Economics Blog Derivatives and Monetary Policy Expectations
Second in a two-part series
Market prices provide timely information on policy expectations. But as we emphasized in our previous post, they can deviate from investors’ expectations of the most likely path because they embed risk premiums and represent probability-weighted averages over different possible paths. In contrast, surveys explicitly ask respondents for their views on the likely path of economic variables. In this post, we highlight two surveys conducted by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York that provide information about expectations that can complement market-based measures.

Continue reading "Survey Measures of Expectations for the Policy Rate" »

Posted by Blog Author at 12:05 PM in Financial Markets, Monetary Policy | Permalink | Comments (0)

Interest Rate Derivatives and Monetary Policy Expectations



First in a two-part series
Market expectations of the path of future policy rates can have important implications for financial markets and the economy. Because interest rate derivatives enable market participants to hedge against or speculate on potential changes in various short-term U.S. interest rates, they are a rich and timely source of information on market expectations. In this post, we describe how information about market expectations can be derived from interest rate futures and forwards, focusing on three main instruments: federal funds futures, overnight index swaps (OIS), and Eurodollar futures. We also discuss how options on interest rate futures can be used to gain insight into the full distribution of rate expectations—information that cannot be gleaned from futures or forwards alone. In a forthcoming companion post, we explore an alternative source of policy rate expectations based on the two surveys conducted by the Trading Desk at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

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Posted by Blog Author at 12:00 PM in Financial Markets, Monetary Policy | Permalink | Comments (2)

November 05, 2014

Forecasting Inflation with Fundamentals . . . It’s Hard!



Controlling inflation is at the core of monetary policymaking, and central bankers would like to have access to reliable inflation forecasts to assess their progress in achieving this goal. Producing accurate inflation forecasts, however, turns out not to be a trivial exercise. This posts reviews the key challenges in inflation forecasting and discusses some recent developments that attempt to deal with these challenges.

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Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Macroecon, Monetary Policy | Permalink | Comments (4)

September 29, 2014

Direct Purchases of U.S. Treasury Securities by Federal Reserve Banks

Kenneth D. Garbade

From time to time, and most recently in the April 2014 meeting of the Treasury Borrowing Advisory Committee, U.S. Treasury officials have questioned whether the Treasury should have a safety net that would allow it to continue to meet its obligations even in the event of an unforeseen depletion of its cash balances. (Cash balances can be depleted by an unanticipated shortfall in revenues or a spike in disbursements, an inability to access credit markets on a timely basis, or an auction failure.) The original version of the Federal Reserve Act provided a robust safety net because the act implicitly allowed Reserve Banks to buy securities directly from the Treasury. This post reviews the history of the Fed’s direct purchase authority. (A more extensive version of the post appears in this New York Fed staff report.)

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Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Financial Institutions, Monetary Policy | Permalink | Comments (2)

September 26, 2014

The FRBNY DSGE Model Forecast



Fifth in a five-part series
This series examines the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (FRBNY DSGE) model—a structural model used by Bank researchers to understand the workings of the U.S. economy and provide economic forecasts. The U.S. economy has been in a gradual but slow recovery. Will the future be more of the same? This post presents the current forecasts from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s (FRBNY) DSGE model, described in our earlier “Bird’s Eye View” post, and discusses the driving forces behind the forecasts. Find the code used for estimating the model and producing all the charts in this blog series here. (We should reiterate that these are not the official New York Fed staff forecasts, but only an input to the overall forecasting process at the Bank.)

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Posted by Blog Author at 10:00 AM in Macroecon, Monetary Policy | Permalink | Comments (3)

September 25, 2014

Connecting “the Dots”: Disagreement in the Federal Open Market Committee



People disagree, and so do the members of the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC). How much do they disagree? Why do they disagree? We look at the FOMC’s projections of the federal funds rate (FFR) and other variables and compare them with those in the New York Fed’s Survey of Primary Dealers (SPD). We show that the members of the FOMC tend to disagree more than the primary dealers and offer some potential explanations.


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Posted by Blog Author at 7:05 AM in Macroecon, Monetary Policy | Permalink | Comments (1)

An Assessment of the FRBNY DSGE Model's Real-Time Forecasts, 2010-13



Fourth in a five-part series
This series examines the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (FRBNY DSGE) model—a structural model used by Bank researchers to understand the workings of the U.S. economy and provide economic forecasts. The previous post in this series showed how the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s DSGE model can be used to provide an interpretation of the Great Recession and the slow recovery. In this post, we look at the role of the model as a forecasting tool and evaluate its forecasting performance since 2010. This analysis will give context for the last post, which will present the model’s current forecast for the U.S. economy.

Continue reading "An Assessment of the FRBNY DSGE Model's Real-Time Forecasts, 2010-13" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Macroecon, Monetary Policy | Permalink | Comments (0)

September 24, 2014

Developing a Narrative: The Great Recession and Its Aftermath



Third in a five-part series
This series examines the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (FRBNY DSGE) model—a structural model used by Bank researchers to understand the workings of the U.S. economy and provide economic forecasts. The severe recession experienced by the U.S. economy between December 2007 and June 2009 has given way to a disappointing recovery. It took three and a half years for GDP to return to its pre-recession peak, and by most accounts this broad measure of economic activity remains below trend today. What precipitated the U.S. economy into the worst recession since the Great Depression? And what headwinds are holding back the recovery? Are these headwinds permanent, calling for a revision of our assessment of the economy’s speed limit? Or are they transitory, although very long-lasting, as the historical record on the persistent damages inflicted by financial crisis seems to suggest? In this post, we address these questions through the lens of the FRBNY DSGE model.

Continue reading "Developing a Narrative: The Great Recession and Its Aftermath" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Macroecon, Monetary Policy | Permalink | Comments (5)

September 23, 2014

A Bird’s Eye View of the FRBNY DSGE Model



Second in a five-part series
This series examines the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (FRBNY DSGE) model—a structural model used by Bank researchers to understand the workings of the U.S. economy and provide economic forecasts. Dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) models provide a stylized representation of reality. As such, they do not attempt to model all the myriad relationships that characterize economies, focusing instead on the key interactions among critical economic actors. In this post, we discuss which of these interactions are captured by the FRBNY model and describe how we quantify them using macroeconomic data. For more curious readers, this New York Fed working paper provides much greater detail on these and other aspects of the model.

Continue reading "A Bird’s Eye View of the FRBNY DSGE Model" »

Posted by Blog Author at 7:00 AM in Macroecon, Monetary Policy | Permalink | Comments (2)
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